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WETA
Oct 31, 2012 12:30am EDT
tavis: good evening. from los angeles, i am tavis smiley. first a look at the latino voting with fernando espuelas. also robert glasper is here. his ep features performances by the roots. we are glad you joined us. king had that said there is right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are onlyavwe hr . fwaht and we have work to do. fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like thank you. tavis: fernando espuelas is the host of the show that bears his name. he is one of the 100 notable hispanics. thank you for being here. it predicts a record latino turnout this time around. >> it is clear with all this enthusiasm across the nation they really galvanized a lot of people. tavis: i assume he is going to get the lion's share of that vote. >> they are 75%, so mr. romney has the lowest support since its gerald ford. i think mr. romney made a strategic decision to go after the hispanic vote. the republican platform reflects that. tavis: how would you situ
WETA
Oct 9, 2012 12:00am EDT
tavis: good evening. from los angeles, i am tavis smiley. tonight, a conversation with joan walsh. she has a new book, "what's the matter w/white people?: why we long for a golden age that never was," and also tonight, technology correspondent david pogue. starting this week, he takes over as host of "nova sciencenow" here on pbs. that is coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: joan walsh is an editor at large for salon and the author of a new book, "what's the matter w/white people?: why we long for a golden age that never was." she joins us tonight from new york. >> thank you, tavis. good to be back. tavis: this title is provocative. "what's the matter with wh
WETA
Oct 30, 2012 12:30am EDT
tavis: good evening. from los angeles, i am tavis smiley. hurricane thin the is not only wreaking havoc which residents, but it has forced an awkward pause one night before the election. we have a look of the state of the race and how it has impacted the campaign schedule with jonathan martin. as polls continue to tighten, the race could boil down to not just a handful of swing states but to a handful of counties within those states. >> there is a saying dr. king had that says it is always the right thing. we know we are only about half way to defeating honker. region in h-- walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: as hurricane sandy continues to churn, our thoughts are with those who are dealing with loss of power. it has created an awkward situation with the presidential campaign just days to go. we are grateful jonathan martin joins us this evening. good he is the senior reporter for public ago. thank you for being here. fellowalk about the citizens impacted by
WETA
Oct 17, 2012 6:00pm EDT
work for a wide range of companies. from small businesses to major corporations. what can we do for you? >> bbc world news was presented by kcet los angeles.
WETA
Oct 24, 2012 12:00am EDT
tavis: good evening. from los angeles, i am tavis smiley. tonight, a conversation with best-selling novelist t.c. boyle. he is out this fall with his latest, called "san miguel." the book is already a new york times best-seller and focuses on three strong-willed women. a conversation with t.c. boyle is coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have a lot of work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: please welcome t.c. boyle back to this program. the perennial new york times best selling author is again on the times' list with his latest, called "san miguel." he continues his post at the english department at usc. good to have you back on this program. >> thanks. tavis: do you want to talk about the book first or politics first? >> whenever you want to talk about is fine with me. tavis: are you happy that last night was the last debate? >> i certainly am. tavis: what do you make of the fact that these races for the white house seemed to be perennial campaigns? if you lose, like romney did last time, the campaign continues. if you win, like obama did, the campaign continues. >> i think we need to change the constitution. there should be 16-year term. -- one 6-year term. i have a whole five-point plan to reinvigorate america. tavis: give me more. >> i would legalize all drugs and sell them at the pharmacy tomorrow. we would be in the black in a year. i would cut the defense budget by half and double the salary of every teacher in america. i would reinvigorate the ccc, give everybody $20, and fill some pot holes. keep it going, number four, i would mandate that every car in america has to drive on hydrogen fuel. in five years. tavis: that would solve the energy dependence problem. >> there are a few guys who give a lot of money to our politicians in the oil industry who would not like that very much. in short, what i'm saying is, in order to do this, i would have to seize power in this country. i am too busy writing books. tavis: what do you make of the fact that some of the things you just said our common sense ideas, particularly the one about the cars. and the teachers, that makes sense. what do you make of the fact that so much of these campaigns, so much has to do with getting away with common-sense ideas? i sense there are so wedded to ideology that we look passed out -- will pass good ideas. >> it is war out there and it has been for the last 20 years or so. it is a shame. our president wants to be ecumenical. i hope that he can be in his second term. i hope that the other party will listen to that. tavis: i like your word choice, ecumenical. that is one way to put it. almost to a person, every guess i have had on this program, every guest who supports the president, believes that, in a second term, he is going to be that way, ecumenical, more progressive. what is the reason he is going to be more of that? >> it depends on congress as well, if he can get anything done. we will see what congress looks like after the election as well. but politics, it is like every four years, it is talking about movie stars getting divorced and married. let's not talk about things like that. let's talk about the real things that matter in this world, like literature. [laughter] tavis: one last question and we will come back to what really matters, literature. where foreign policy is concerned, that was the center of the last debate. in the coming days, people will be the constructing who won, who lost, what the distinctions are. do you think mr. romney is ready for prime time? every time he opened up his mouth about foreign policy, he put his foot in his mouth. is he ready for prime time on foreign policy. >> i like the fact when our president points out the fact that he has been the president for the last four years. that gives a stamp of authority. tavis: we will see what happens just days from now. are you a in the booth kind of guy or a by mail kind of guy? >> i have to vote by mail because i am on a long book tour. i will not be home for it. i am a lifelong democrat and if i voted my self interests, i would be a republican. but i do not, because i believe in social issues. tavis: i feel you on that, in more ways than one, especially where my money is concerned. i digress on that point. what really matters in the world, literature, let me offer this question as a way into the conversation about your new book. in one of the earlier debates -- a lot of things have not been discussed in these debates, but in the last one, the town hall debate, we had a conversation where somebody asked a specific question about education. we did get some conversation about education. let me ask specifically what the value is these days of a liberal arts education. you have one of those educations. it is getting poo-poo'ed more than ever now. make the best case you can make for a good liberal arts education. >> me, sitting right here. i am the first of my family to go to college. my father made it to the eighth grade. my mother made high school, but it was the depression. i am solely a product of state schools and state universities. for liberal arts, that is why i continue at usc. i love the idea that it transformed me. i went to music school as a saxophone player. i loved john coltrane. he was my hero. i wanted to be just like him. he was a genius and i was not. i felt my audition, but i was at a liberal arts college. i said, what my going to do? i became an english major. i discovered flannery o'connor so i was history and english. junior year, i went into a creative writing class and here i am, talking to you. a lot of young people do not know who they are or what they want to be. i think it's great that you can be exposed to a whole lot of -- where there be a psychologist alive if we did not have to take psych 101? tavis: you mentioned john coltrane and you made a joke that he was a genius and you were not. a lot of folks will get a liberal arts education but there will not become t.c. boyle. you are a genius at writing books. not everyone will become t.c. boyle. you get a liberal arts education and you come out and you do what with it? how do you answer that question practically for young people who want to get a job? we saw that there are just not enough jobs out there for them. as opposed to looking for what the world needs and try to plug into a degree that way, what do you do? >> i have no idea what to do in life. i wound up teaching. again, let's get more people into the teaching profession. who have a brain and the ability. that is one thing we can do. tavis: if you are not going to pay them and moreover, going to attack them, how do you convince people to be teachers? >> salary. remember my 5-point plan. tavis: i forgot, you are running. >> absolutely. i would make it an attractive profession. it is the essence and lifeblood of everything we have going on in this country and we are neglecting it. by the way, you asked a specific question, what are we going to do with them? i am teaching fiction writing. everybody who wants to be in my position is not going to make it at that level. there are other fields that they go into. a lot of my students can go into journalism, film. since they're very creative, about half of them are out on the boulevard with very creative signs begging for change. [laughter] tavis: let me go right to the book, "san miguel." how does it feel to be a woman? >> it feels good, thank you. last time, we were talking about "when the killings done." i discovered a story and it was a memoir. when i first discovered the book, it was the view of the husband and the wife. once i got into it, i realize that i just want to channel these women. it is a challenge. can i do it? can i inherit the persona of a woman? i took it as a challenge. it was not easy to do but i am happy to do it. tavis: i know you put the book out and the new york times has it on the list. a lot of people think you have done a good job. what do you think of how you inhabited these women? >> is not for me to say. let me put it this way -- my mom loves it. tavis: if your mom likes it, that is all that matters. >> i will say that while i was composing this book, i did wear a skirt and it helped. i will see you again next year. i am just about to begin a new novel. i have done research for it. it is a contrast from this one. it will be your basic hairy- chested man is novel. i have been shaving under hear all this time. i am just going to let it go. [laughter] but you dodding, not want to do the same thing over and over again. i am always trying for a new way in. i am an artist. that is what i do. i am not interested in giving speeches. i am just interested in this art. it is fascinating for me. i begin a book, i have no idea where it is going to go where -- or what is going to be. it is a process of discovery so it is exciting. tavis: what did you find most challenging about trying to give a voice, although it is a horse -- is a historical novel, but what was the most difficult part of trying to channel and give a voice to these women? >> even more difficult, it is the first long book i have done that is not, a court does not have any irony. i grew up as a wise guy and i work more easily with irony and comedy. i am taking a lot of challenges here. the hardest thing was the second part of the book about the daughter, edith. my own daughter, who is now 31 years old, she insisted that i should tell the story of a 15- year-old girl in 1888. i took it as a challenge to try to do that. for those who do not know, i should tell a little bit about the story. there are two narratives going on. the first is 1888. i discovered this partial diary by a woman called out morantha waters. she was living in san francisco with her husband in a nice apartment. her second husband said to her, you have $10,000 from your first husband. let's invest in san miguel island. it is one of the islands off the coast of santa barbara, where i live, the farthest south and the windiest. the problem with her, she had consumption. it is 1888. the only cure they knew was a rest cure with fresh air. in san for cisco, we all know it is foggy, cold, and miserable. her husband said, if we go to san miguel, it will be warmer, good air, it will help you. guess what? it is even worse than san francisco. the wind blows, it is eroded, they have sandstorms, so she did not do so well. she lasted six months and a few years later, she died. meanwhile, the husband, like some fairy tale, took the young girl, edith, out of school and brought her back out there to live with three men and be there to take care of her. whether she escapes or not, i am not going to tell everybody. you are going to have to read the book. the second part, i was amazed at the correspondences between the other story. a second family lived on the island trying to do the same thing, to raise sheep and live apart from america, live your own utopian world. again, a war veteran, a woman who was also 38, a librarian from new york city. he brought her out there and things went pretty well for them until world war two came along. of course, there is a lot of misery involved. why would i write a book without misery in it? people do not really want to be miserable -- tavis: speaking of world war two and misery, you wrote this book during our break recession. -- our great recession. how does the timing of writing a book impact the riding of the book? >> great observation. the second story takes place during the depression. the lester family became quite well known as a result. they were featured on night magazine with photos, swiss family lester. the whole country was in a depression and they fixated on this family as living apart of their own country and being self-sustaining. they had two young daughters while they were there. the daughters had never been a short period when they first came ashore to santa barbara, they were 4 and 7 years old. the press followed them around. the girls had never seen a tree, a house, a car. their first ice cream cone was reported by photographers. it is pretty fascinating. the fact that they were living there during the depression fascinated everyone. why could we all not live like this? tavis: talk to me about the notion of escapism. you do not get at this directly in the novel, but as i go through it, i sense that the channel islands, although it did not turn out the way he did -- the way edith thought it might, i sense that these islands represent a sort of escapism for these characters. >> and for me, too. we have talked about my last four books. more and more, i am interested in our impact on the planet. 7 billion a loss, -- of us, a finite planet, what is to become of that? where do we go from here? there is an element of this idea of utopia in my work. you can trace it back for several books. i do not have any solutions, unlike my political solutions, which would put us back on track in a year. i am just posing the question and i am exploring the stories for my own benefit. i want to put myself inside these people and see what they might have -- what they might have actually said and however but it felt. tavis: i have not had a chance to ask you this in all the conversations we have had. tell me about your process. i know you are away from usc because you are out on tour. you are not teaching this semester. how does your process work? you are putting out these best- selling books and novels and teaching at the same time. how do you do all that? >> i was born hyperactive. in my day, when i was a kid, we did not have psychiatrists and ritalin. we just had a back door. [laughter] i spent most of my life, winter and summer, outside. i have a lot of energy. even now, as an old man, i'm going to be 87 in december. tavis: yeah, i know. do you write in the mornings and teach during the day? >> people say, i write every day, but not today. because i am on tour. you see me once per year. i am locked away, dressed in rags, shivering, typing. that is my life. i tried to keep mentally healthy by realizing i am not going to work 12 hours per day. i'm going to work three or four hours and the rest of the day, i go and do something physical. i have to clean up after my wife, do your work, what on the beach, hike, i rent a place up in the sequoia forest. i spend a lot of time up there by myself, like walt whitman, walking in the wilderness, muttering to myself with tears streaming down my cheeks. this is my hobby. [laughter] tavis: you have said that you do art to the exclusion of everything else. when you focus in on it, it excludes everything else. tell me why i should not read that as an elitist statement coming from an artist? >> maybe it is, but i consider it more just. i am able to do what i wanted to do. you look at me today, this elegant man sitting before you, you would never imagine that i might have been a scruffy, rebellious degenerate, you know? tavis: from new york. >> i do not do well with authority or agreeing with anybody on anything. to have this loaner profession is ideal for me. tavis: there are points that i can go back to in this conversation where it finally occurred to me, last night, doing my research for this conversation, to ask you whether or not, given that you grew up and were born in new york, would you have written these kinds of books -- you see where i'm going with this -- the story lines, the narratives, the characters, let's start with "san miguel." would you have written this stuff if you had stayed in new york and not come to california? >> not at all. we all have these choices to make in life than we do not know where we are going to wind up. i was saying to her, i got my ph.d. at the university of iowa. i wanted to be a professor and i interviewed a couple of places, including minneapolis. usc gave me a job and i came here. maybe i would be writing about swedish immigrants, but i came here and there was the debate over illegal immigration from the south. i wrote a book to try to address that. i've written several books set in southern california. i would have been a totally different artist if i had stayed in new york or gone to minneapolis or stayed in iowa city. it is where life takes you. we are all curious. i am extremely curious about where i
WETA
Oct 27, 2012 12:30am EDT
tavis: good evening. from los angeles, i am tavis smiley. tonight a conversation with salman khan. he is part of the national conversation about how we improve schools. his goal of providing a free world-class education to anyone, anywhere, is ambitious, to be sure. his success has landed him on the top 100 list can receive approval from the gates foundation. our conversation with salman khan, coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: if you think they are not any big ideas out there, salman khan is a man with a big idea. he founded the free nonprofit khan academy to provide free education to anyone, anywhere. he has delivered more than 45 million lessons today. salma
WETA
Oct 10, 2012 12:00am EDT
tavis: good evening. from los angeles, i am tavis smiley. tonight a conversation with the first african-american woman to win best director at the sundance film festival. her project is the film "middle of nowhere." it opens this weekend in new york, l.a., and other select cities. we're glad you joined us. a conversation with filmmaker ava duvernay coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: ava duvernay became the first african-american woman to win best director at this year's sundance film festival. the movie is set in south l.a. and looks at the life of a woman whose husband is sentenced to eight years in prison. here are some scenes from "middle of nowhere." >> d
WETA
Oct 11, 2012 6:00pm EDT
industries. what can we do for you? >> "bbc world news" was >> "bbc world news" was presented by kcet, los angeles
WETA
Oct 19, 2012 6:00pm EDT
>> this is "bbc world news america." >> this is "bbc world news." funding for this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers use their expertise in global finance to guide you through the business strategies and opportunities of international commerce. we put our extended global network to work for a wide range of companies, from small businesses to major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news." >> this is "bbc world news america," from washington. a massive bomb blast rips through the heart of beirut. fears that the violence and syria has spilled over into lebanon. the u.s. presidential candidates blanket their base. an actress makes a big impression on the silver screen. she takes it all in stride. attention but not too much. i don't want to get too excited. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. there are fears that the conflict in service is spilling over. an official has been killed by a huge car bomb in beirut. the leading opponent is bashar al-assad. syria's leader is being accused of being behind the bombing. >> they rushed to eastern beirut. this was as the weekend was about to begin. the bomb went off in a crowded mainly christian district of the city. local tv stations were broadcasting images of burned out cars and images of wounded people. 8 people were killed and as many as 100 were injured. the main target was a brigadier general, the chief security official in lebanon. he had recently implicated syria and its lebanese allies, hezbollah, for the killing of the prime minister. he was a fierce critic of syria. this will create shockwaves in the entire region. after a long time of relative calm, this is the first big attack in four years. many feared something like this to happen sooner or later and that lebanon would be dragged into the conflict some political leaders have accused the assad regime in syria of being behind the attack. >> for more on the incident from of volatility out of the region, i spoke a brief time ago with a senior fellow at the washington institute for near east policy. does this bombing show the conflict has spread into lebanon? >> it has spread to the heart of beirut. it has been spreading for a couple of months, the border areas mostly. we see this with the sunni-shi'a tensions excel rating. this is the big move into the capital. >> one politician has said that the syrian president is behind the bombing. is that a credible claim? >> yes, the head of the information bureau, the intelligence in lebanon, that was investigating the role of -- who was backed by damascus in carrying out a number of bombings. this is a clear message to back off inside of those factors. >> lebanon and syria, the politics go hand in hand. many of the same sex in each country overlap and families overlap. it is very hard to be a fool on war in the regime in damascus for that to not eventually to come over into some kind of turmoil in lebanon. >> i remember seeing of the enormous crater caused by the assassination of the prime minister. what does this portend? >> it means we're going back to a time now where the regime in damascus is starting to lash out into lebanon and to affect the politics there because they know that upset in that would ultimately upset the balance for the u.s. and its allies like israel and the region. this is a sign that this is getting much worse, it is not going to go away anytime soon and this is spilling over its borders into lebanon. >> could this lead to clashes between sunni and shi'a in lebanon? >> yes, it already has. in this case, it will immediately undermine its investigation. it could see the court case affected. this would be a big blow against those who are against syria and lebanon. we have to worry about that. >> do think that they will be trying to calm the conflict in his own country? >> bashar al-assad's mo is to escalate the situation. to calm it down. this is a ruthless strategy. it is working until now until we get some kind of international intervention. i think that is alternately inevitable. >> thank you. >> tomorrow, it will be a year since the uprising in libya saw the caption and killing of colonel gaddafi. libya had an unexpectedly peaceful democratic election this summer. the country is still struggling to overcome the legacy of 32 years. our middle east editor reports in libya. >> they have captured the dictator. they miss him. a year ago, their son was the one who found colonel gaddafi hiding in a drainage pipe. as a revolutionary hearing, he posed with the gun that he took from gaddafi. his parents still have it. his son died after being tortured and captured by men still loyal to their dead leader. at the same time, he was tortured by gaddafi's people, hung upside down, ripped, burned, and given electric shocks. female nurses cut his ankles and said it was the flesh of misrata's rats. both were held in the last refuge. this week, he has been under attack by fighters loyal to the new order. during the civil war last year, walid helped to defend misrata. this was the center of the war. steadily, it has been rebuilt. their victory museum is here, but when in the peace, unravelling gaddafi's legacy is taking time. -- but winning the peace is taking time. the regime is likened to a bottle of cola that had been shaken for 40 years. the civil war has not been restarted. it could have been much much worse. colonel gaddafi possible leadership compound is being used as a rubbish dump. parliament is struggling to form a central government. there are dozens of collisions with their own agendas. >> i don't believe the situation will deteriorate dramatically. if it did, libya could go back to tribal rule. that would solve its problems easily. >> if the democrats cannot started governing soon, the divisions in this country might overwhelm them. time is not elastic. >> afghan police say that at least 18 people, mostly women and children have died in explosions in the north of the country. a roadside bomb cut through a minibus carrying a wedding party. another deadly explosion, this time in yemen. 40 soldiers at a military base. it was thought that a car bomb was set off by al qaeda militants. the chinese navy is conducting exercises near disputed islands. ships and military aircraft have been sent to japan. tensions between the nations have risen since the japanese government bought some of the islands from a private landowner last month. the former prime minister, silvio berlusconi, has made a rare appearance at his trial for allegedly paying an underage prostitutes for sex. he told the court that he never had an intimate relationship with any kind with the moroccan- born dancer. she was 17 when she attended one of his private parties. he said that he believed her when she said she was 24. here in the u.s., there are just 18 days to go until the presidential election. barack obama and mitt romney are spending so much time in a handful of states that still up for grabs the mason gain residency there. no republican has ever won the white house without winning ohio. this is not the first time that the students have rushed to hear a democratic president make his case. >> it was packed with people. >> joanne was here in 1964 when lyndon johnson drove into town and set out his bold vision for tackling poverty and racial inequality. >> i've helped to build the great society. >> the cornerstone was a government program to help the poor and elderly. today, joanne worries that mitt romney would like to dismantle them. >> people need to know that they need those government programs so that they continue that everyone can get help. >> mr. obama does not have an lbj style big vision for his second term. he says his opponent has no vision at all. >> you heard of the new deal, you have heard of the fair deal. mitt romney is trying to sell you a sketchy deal. we are not buying it. >> ohio has benefited from billions of dollars in bailouts for the auto industry. it has won mr. obama a lot of support. >> that affects one in 8 jobs in ohio. i don't think that you can be from ohio and talk about jobs without recognizing that. >> i think that we have some momentum. this will be like a square rather than a wheel. away from the liberal college campuses, they're not so convinced. in a way, the state represents what this election is really all about. it is a philosophical, almost moldavite between those who believe that government money has helped ohio and those who think it just as fervently that the government only gets in a way of the natural entrepreneurial spirit. mitt romney is campaigning hard here. >> it is freedom that drives america. >> introducing him at a rally was this woman. >> i am not a politician, i'm a businesswoman. >> our business is baskets. >> this is a vision of my father who was a classic american entrepreneur. he believed that if you were going to make a statement, do it big. certainly, a seven story basket makes a statement. >> they employ 1000 people in ohio and thousands more across the u.s.. crating paychecks is the job of businesses, not government. this president believes that government can help, should help, will help. >> quite frankly over the years, i would like less government involvement in helping me run my business. >> ohio is critical and elections because it is a microcosm of america. it has a diversity of people, life styles, and prospectus. how does people vote ultimately determines who will win the white house. >> both campaigned by the polls in ohio. when the the major cities has a lesson or two for gridlock washington. columbus has traded jobs and encourage investment. the democratic mayor worked with republican business leaders to get results. we spoke with the mayor about this rare show of bipartisanship. >> we have to have a balance between cuts and revenue. we did not want to impact of the quality of life in the city of columbus. i went to the business community and said, i have to ask for a tax increase. i was concerned that some of those businesses might go somewhere else. businesses are very mobile these days. what happened was that they ended up supporting a tax increase and helping to finance the campaign that the public ended up supporting. we passed a tax increase. we passed the lowest -- the greatest recession in the city of columbus. >> if you did that here in columbus, is this something that can be done nationally? if you sides of the economic debate will not alone talk to each other let alone to operate. >> in order to have prosperity, you have to do both and it could be substantial cuts. >> she managed to get republicans to sign on to that. they're not doing so in washington. >> you have to have cuts and revenue. i went to the business community. i think they understand. they know that they cannot cut their way to a profit. they have to do a couple of things. they have to be more efficient, work in the market, and sometimes they have to raise prices. we do a combination of those things, you usually end up in a better position than where you were. you cannot do one sometimes without the other. >> you did it in columbus, how come they cannot do it in washington? >> it is baffling. it is a political problem. how do we do this? we asked their opinion. bring them into the formula. it is not just the white house versus congress, democrats versus republicans. what is your opinion? how do you do this? i guarantee you that they will do something like we have done. there was the stability in the country and the progress in all of the communities. >> speaking to the mayor of columbus ohio. do remember to stay with us for full election coverage including the debate. you are watching "bbc world news america," still to come. remarkable signs of recovery. doctors help the girl shot in the head by the taliban. a year ago, it would have been unthinkable. now, the u.s. has invited from month to partake in the joint military exercises. this brings military's from across the region. this is a sign of improving relations with the u.s.. the u.s. is taking a symbolic step. >> what we know is that burma is on the last -- on the list of those invited. we don't know if this invitation is final. this is only an invitation that is an observer. this is with mostly u.s. and thai forces, the longstanding allies. they usually bring in the forces of many neighboring countries as well. bringing the burmese military in would be a very dramatic step. the military is the most controversial part of the old regime in burma. they have already ended economic sanctions. this encourages those that are put in place. there is significant human rights concerns about the way that the army deals with the on commitment to the democratization process. this is a very separate power structure. i think any moves to close ties with the military between the u.s. and the burmese military in particular will be criticized by human-rights groups. we have a way to go before there are substantial ties in terms of military training. clearly, the u.s. would like to move very quickly. this tells you how fast they want to close the gap. >> some positive developments from the doctors treating the pakistani girl shot and the head by the taliban. they say that malala yousafzai is able to stand for the first time and communicate by passing us. she was shot for criticizing taliban militants and supporting education for girls. >> a teenage girl at school. on remarkable around the world. valley, this swat is an act of defiance. this almost cost malala yousafzai her life. she was shot in the head. her story has generated worldwide media focus. doctors have been getting details of their patient. "she was shot just above her left eye. it raised the brain as it passed the temple. it tracked down, damaging her jaw joint on the way and ended up in the muscles above her shoulder blade on the left. we have quite an extensive injury. >> it is remarkable that she survived. >> it is very remarkable. >> the journey to britain began soon after she was attacked 10 days ago. initial surgery removed the bullet. then, the decision to remove her to the queen elizabeth hospital where the staff have extensive experience treating injured british soldiers. "she is doing remarkably well. she was beginning to stand with help from the therapist and the nurses. she is clearly a understanding what we say. she is able to write. >> the government of pakistan has recognized her bravery with one of their highest awards. the medical team hopes that the same courage and determination will help her fight off infection and make a full recovery. >> malala yousafzai's progress. now to another girl capturing attention. she is the star of a low-budget film, "beast of the southern wild." she was just seven when filming ended. now, the industry is abuzz as she could be the first ever actress so young nominated for academy award. >> she plays a hush puppy who have to care for herself and her father when their home is hit by natural disaster. it has been gathering rave reviews. many think an oscar nomination for the 9-year-old. do you think it will happen? >> may be, if it happens it happens. people have been talking about you. how does that feel? >> kind of good and it is fun to have that attention but not too much because i don't get too excited. >> what about being famous? >> i don't like that either. "she might not have a choice if she does go on to be the youngest person ever to win a competitive oscar. she was just five vinci auditioned. even then, the director said that her talent stood out. >> we never saw anything like that at any kid of any age, let alone one that was 5 years old. she could barely read the script but she could perform it. >> since then, the movie has surpassed all expectations. many believe that the film and its young star on their way to making history. >> what will she wear on the red carpet? that brings today's carpet to a close. you can find constant updates on our web site. doocy what we're working on -- to see what we're working on any time, be sure to visit our facebook page. thank you for watching and have a good weekend. >> make sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> funding for this presentation was made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers use their expertise in global finance to guide you through the business strategies and opportunities of international commerce. we put our extended global network to work for a wide range of companies, from small businesses to major corporations. what can we do for you? >> "bbc world news" was presented by kcet, los angeles. ! steele: thanks, lucy. darling, here's a list of places you can reach me.
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Oct 12, 2012 7:00pm EDT
angeles to its new home at the california science center. the retired shuttle left los angeles international airport shortly after midnight, crawling along on a giant carrier. crowds gathered along the way, hoping to catch a glimpse of the spectacle. at two miles an hour, endeavour" will need two days to make the 12-mile trip. in advance, crews raised utility lines and cut down 400 trees to make way for the five-story-tall spaceship and its 78-foot wingspan. wall street has closed out a tough week, its worst since june. the dow jones industrial average managed a gain of just two points today to close at 13,328. the nasdaq fell five points to close at 3,044. for the week, the dow lost 2%; the nasdaq fell nearly 3%. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to judy. >> woodruff: the nobel peace prize was awarded to a group of a half-billion people today; more specifically, the european union. ray suarez has the story. >> suarez: the announcement caused a stir in oslo this morning. >> the norwegian nobel committee has decided that the nobel peace prize for 2012 is to be awarded to th
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Oct 13, 2012 6:30pm EDT
"los angeles times." alexis simendinger of real clear politics. karen tumulty of "the washington post." and jeff zeleny of "the new york times." >> award winning reporting and analysis. covering history as it happens. live from our nation's capital, this is "washington week with gwen ifill." produced in association with "national journal." corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by -- >> we know why we're here. >> to connect our forces to what they need when they need it. >> to help troops see danger. before it sees them. >> to answer the call of the brave and bring them safely home. >> around the globe, the people of boeing are working together to support and protect all serve. >> that's why we're here. >> this rock has never stood still. since 1875, we've been there for our clients through good times and bad. when their needs changed, we were there to meet them. through the years, from insurance to investment management, from real estate to retirement solutions, we've developed new ideas for the financial challenges ahead. this rock has never stood still. and that's one
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Oct 29, 2012 6:00pm EDT
news was presented >> bbc world news was presented by kcet los angeles.
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Oct 23, 2012 12:00am EDT
tavis: good evening. from los angeles, i am tavis smiley. with all three presidential debates behind us, the next two weeks will be a sprint to the finish line in what is virtually a dead heat. election night could be a long night with a couple of key swing states out west possibly holding the key to the race. tonight, we will look at the impact of the west with adam nagourney, l.a. bureau chief for the new york times. his thoughts on a controversial anti-union proposition in california and we would discuss the passing of a liberal lion over the weekend, george mcgovern. a conversation with adam nagourney of the new york times coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have a lot of work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: adam nagourney is the l.a. bureau chief for the new york times following years as the paper's chief national political correspondent. good to have you back on this program. we finally arrive at a day i thought would never come. the debates are finally over. it just two weeks from election day. it has been a perennial campaign. let me start with a question that has been on my mind a lot. what do you make of the perennial, never-ending campaign? if you like mitt romney and lose four years ago, the campaign never stops. even if you are obama and u.n. four years ago, the campaign never stops. america seems to be less about governing and more about campaigning. everything you do is about the campaign. does that make sense? >> i agree with you. the problem has to do with government. there is very little time to get things done. as soon as these guys are in washington, they are already thinking about the next campaign. the first 100 days -- and now, sometimes, it is the first 50 days before things began to change. no matter how the race turns out in two weeks, you will see people, certainly republicans if the president gets elected, heading to iowa before the end of the year. no joke. the question is when we begin to cover it. usually, out of respect, we try to wait. i would bet by one year from now, you will see lots of stories in iowa and new hampshire. tavis: that scares me. >> they have to get fund- raisers, nail down supporters, and the earlier it begins, the more pressure there is on people to do it. if romney loses, you will see a wide open appeal in both sides. tavis: since you went there, i will go there and right back. how long does hillary have to decide whether or not she is going to go in? >> i think she probably has two years. that is a long time. i do agree with you that if she decides to run, she will be a huge front runner. normally, i would not say that this far out, but she has so much appeal and there is a feeling that, if she wants it, it is her turn. more than that, there is a lot of support for her. people think she has done a great job as secretary of state. my sense is that the democratic party doing back-to-back history, that is very powerful. i covered her senate campaign in new york and her presidential campaign in 2008. if you ask me one year ago, i would say, she is 69 and wants to move on. my bet is that she would be tempted to run this time. i think she will run. tavis: bill wants her to run. for what it's worth, president clinton wants her to run. that is into the future. let me come back to the present. the debates are now over. how important do you think foreign policy will be in the last two weeks? clearly, the issue with iran over the last few days is front and center and other issues of national importance. for the typical american voter, how much do you think foreign policy is going to matter over the next two weeks? >> i do not think foreign policy is that big an issue. this time, there is so much concern about the economy, unemployment. this is not, generally speaking, a big deal. the terrorist attack changes things. you will see the libya thing as romney tries to make it an issue. it does not necessarily approve to romney. president obama has gone a long way in establishing his foreign policy credentials. i think it is harder. hypothetically, if there were a terrorist attack, the convention is among journalists is that it helps the challenger. i do not think that is the case at all. i think it makes people want to go with the safe -- tavis: most times, when people are at war, they want to stick with the incumbent. they do not want to be changing horses in midstream. >> the election is about the economy. do people want to trust romney? are they willing to give another four years to barack obama? if i had been romney or the people around him, i would have never wanted foreign policy to be the last debate. i wanted -- i would have wanted it to be something else. tavis: if they did not think that prior to the last debate tonight, -- let me rephrase that. if they did not think that the few -- a couple of months ago, they'd certainly thought it the last couple of months, when every time he talks about foreign policy, he puts his foot in his mouth. whether he is seen as being too political about the libya attack, or in the previous debate, he thought he gave the president a stiff uppercut and he was wrong. i think you are right. if they knew then what they know now, they might not have wanted the last debate to be about foreign policy, but i digress. let's move forward and consider what happened -- what happens. the polls have them in a dead heat. what happens if, on election night, there is a tie in the electoral college. it is possible. what is even more likely is that one wins the electoral college and one wins the popular vote. what is going to happen? >> the electoral votes dies. if it becomes a tie, i believe it goes to the house of representatives. romney would be president. obviously, it would not be a great thing for the country if you had to split between the general election and the electoral college. it happened before, but it could definitely happen. you could have a lot of really close states. i think it is very possible. tavis: covering this every day, why do you think this race is so close? you keep be -- we keep being told that the contrast could not be more stark between the two. why is the race is tight? >> this is an extremely polarized country. a whole group of people very far to the right and a whole group of people are democratic. i think you will have a race split by a couple of points. people are really angry. the tea party on the right and the people on the left have made this a very angry, intense election. we have been having a very divided elections for the past two or three cycles. i do not see that changing any time soon. the country is becoming more polarized. tavis: if president obama were to win in the tightest of tight races, what does that mean for his governance in the second term? >> i think it will make it harder for him to get stuff done. if he wins by a lot, he would probably have more clout with congress. i am assuming they continue to control the house. i am not sure about the senate, but the house, yes. this might be pie in the sky stuff, but after the fighting, that the republicans and democrats will come together. we have a fiscal cliff and are facing major issues. they came close to an agreement last time. maybe they will just do it. on both sides, they have trouble. on the republican side, they have to deal with tea party people who are not giving them much at all and obama has the same problem on the left. tavis: if romney were to win in a very tight election, the argument that he and paul ryan have been making is that they have a better chance of getting a budget passed. they have a better chance to make sure that sequestration becomes a word that we forget ever hearing in the first place because they can work better with congress. do you buy that argument? >> i do not see the grounds for it. there is hardly the up -- there is always the argument that people say, i can do this and this. i am not saying that romney cannot, but let's assume that the democrats control the senate or they lose the senate and the republicans have both. why would the democrats act any differently than republicans? if democrats have as much resistance to the kind of cuts that romney and ryan are talking about, why would democrats be any more flexible than republicans were? you can argue that democrats tend to -- tavis: cave. they cave a lot easier. >> i was thinking roll over. i am wondering if the democrats would not do the same things to the republicans. do not forget, mitch mcconnell in washington two years ago with the congressional correspondent at the time and he said, they made a decision early on that they were not going to give the president anything, any legislative victory at all. the argument he made to republicans was, we cannot give him a vote. if you give him a victory, you lead to reelection. he talked about it openly. obviously, if the president loses, democrats in the senate will be remembering that. that is my guest. it will be more difficult for romney. the one thing he will have for the first 100 days, he will have the momentum, the honeymoon and all of that. i think that will be a short- lived honeymoon. tavis: let me ask you a question i seem to be talked it -- talking about with guests every night, whether or not the president, does he become more progressive, does he try to touch issues that he did not touch in the first term? everybody is hoping and believing that he is going to go left when he gets elected. among the black community, even people who care about progressive causes. do you believe something will come out in the second term? >> for example, immigration. he did some stuff during the first four years. not a lot. what are you thinking that you would like him to do? tavis: the question is whether he will change on immigration reform. if he does not, the hispanics will go nuts. if he does not fix immigration reform, if he does not get more aggressive on the jobs front, african-americans at the top of the unemployment list, they will start to get more vocal about jobs. i could do this all night. >> i do not want to sound remotely defensive. presumably, he would have liked to have more stimulus money. it would have led to have -- to us having significantly lower unemployment. there was only some much he could get out of congress. that is the reality. i think this is a good argument -- latino voters could provide the margin of victory for him. he will be under a lot of pressure. he will try to get something through on immigration. republicans have changed on immigration since 2004. when george w. bush was president, he realized the power of latino voters. he was pushing the idea of a more permissive immigration policy. the party swung to the right. look at what happened with john mccain. that is not a tenable position long term. in the state where we are right now, across the west, where latinos are becoming more and more decisive, i do not think you can have a policy that is overly-harsh to a latino voters or immigrants. it is a slow move. you watched the primaries and you saw how much the parties embraced this tough rhetoric. romney is paying a price for that. >> i could add to that list. i do not need to, but there are a number of issues that labor has been very quiet about. particularly some of these treaties, labor agreements with other nations. there are a number of things you could put on the list, but i digress on that point. you mentioned nevada and colorado. you have been the l.a. bureau chief for a few years now. welcome to california and what it will feel like on election night when you feel like an afterthought because the rest of the country is important and the west does not seem to matter to most of the networks. they start calling elections and giving us poll results. you get the feeling that the rest of us have. >> i love california. tavis: you know what it feels like. >> networks calling in. when you are in new york, the campaign does not exist in california or new york unless you have a lot of money. tavis: you cover this every day for the times. this year might be different. if this race is as tight as we said earlier, it could be that nevada, colorado, we end up being decisive. tell me more. >> we have been talking about this in arizona, nevada -- not arizona, nevada, colorado, once upon a time new mexico, but no more. they are becoming swing states, really contested. this coming week, both the president and romney are going to nevada. only six electoral votes, but it has become a really contested state. the west is what the midwest used to be, to some extent. it is a very divided part of the country. the west used to be not so much. there was a point in this campaign were the obama people were putting people in arizona and testing whether they could put arizona in play. they decided in the end that they could not or it was not worth the investment. there are people who argue, which is not wacky to say, that at some point texas will become a democratic state. >> with regard to nevada and colorado, what is happening that is putting them in play? >> is all demographic. a big part of it is the latino vote. states are going to be more and more democratic. it is a slow move. it has gone from republican to in play. they are heading democratic. tavis: does romney have a shot at getting a significant portion of the latino vote? >> bush 43 got 45% in the exit polls. i think mccain got 35%. i think that is probably romney's ceiling. ideally, he needs to get more. how much does romney cut into obama's support? , to do latino voters think about immigration being a key issue -- how much do latino voters think about immigration being a key issue? there was a poll that showed among the general population, and i will be off by a little bit, 89% were certain they would vote. among latino voters, it was a 10-point drop off. that is a big deal. let's add florida to that list, too. iowa, at one point you have got at north carolina. he is thinking, we have got to pump that turnout. tavis: i agree with you. when a race is this close, turnout becomes key. in that regard, mr. romney has momentum over the last weeks. mr. obama came back in the second debate and made it an interesting contest. there will be a lot of talk in the coming days about what happened tonight. my sense is tonight will have been the least-watched debate. >> i agree. it is foreign policy. tavis: monday night football. i raise that because i want to come to this point about turnout. mr. romney has been gaining steam, no doubt about it. both of these guys have, over the course of this campaign, have admitted enthusiasm gaps. mr. romney has and enthusiasm gap on his right flank and mr. obama has an enthusiasm that on his left flank. talk about how they are closing those gaps? >> if obama loses, we will go back to the first debate again and again. it was devastating for a number are reasons. not only for his flat performance and because romney made himself acceptable to voters, but he stimulated republican base voters who had not been before. people love that he went after him that way. you could see an explosion in the level of energy. that was a big deal. enthusiasm among republican voters, including voters on the right, who are always suspicious of his positions on abortion, gay rights, gun control, they are really enthusiastic. at the same time, before he came into this election, there was not much enthusiasm for the president after the first debate. people were saying, why am i giving you money? why am i working so hard for you if you are going to perform like that? i believe that he went a decent way in recovering with the second debate. i think a lot of his ads we are not seen because we do not live in swing states are real adds that ends with a line saying tommy -- sang, "mitt romney, he is not one of us." they are alarmed with the prospect of president obama and they're trying to get the word out there. tavis: it has long been the case that he who wins ohio when it all. do you think that applies this time around? >> i do think that is true. the rules of politics are always proven wrong. learn from the past but do not stop looking to the future. do i think that romney has to win -- romney pretty much have to win ohio to win the race. unless there is a weird explosion that i cannot imagine, he has to. i think the president can win without winning ohio, but it is hard. tavis: a final question about george mcgovern passing. it raises the obvious conversation about liberalism then reverses liberalism now -- then versus now. e> it is hard togi ieonemarg g mcgovern thriving in a political atmosphere like this. he identified with too many issues that were politically problematic. i read in the new york times the obituary of him. he did a pre-obituary interview, which we tend to do. he talked a lot about this. it is worth going back and looking at it. he was as proud of his positions and really believed in them. i was refreshed by it. he was very down-to-earth. there was no one out there who is anywhere like him. no one is calling themselves a liberal anymore. tavis: i am out of time but i want you to go to our web site because i want ask him about prop. 32. this is the most-watched ballot measure in the entire country. if this thing passes in california, it will have a huge impact on labor unions across the country. go on line to watch the answer to that question. that is it for tonight. until next time, thanks for watching. until -- as always, keep the faith. >> for more information on today's show, visit tavis smiley at pbs.org. tavis: hi, i'm tavis smiley. joining next time for a conversation with award-winning novelist t.c. boyle. that is next time. we will see you then. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have a lot of work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> be more. pbs. >> be more. pbs.
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Oct 9, 2012 6:00pm EDT
>> this is "bbc world news." funding of this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to know your business, offering specialized solutions and capital to help you meet your growth objectives. we offer expertise and tailored solutions for small businesses and major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news." in >> this is "pc world news america." the german chancellor visit to athens and take a look at the welcome she received. austerity wreaks say it is her fault. >> here to show support for their great people but on the streets, there is huge frustration. >> defying the taliban for a girl's right to go to school, this girl shot at close range. the first talks about his front- row seat. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and also around the globe. these were just a few of the things that greeted angela merkel on her trip to greece today, the first trip since the crisis began to show her support for the austerity plan. but the greek people blame germany for the economic hardships they are suffering. today, they cut their frustrations i haunt her. >> no post-war german chancellor has the reception quite like this. groups comparing her to the not these for insisting on austerity. large parts of the capital were sealed off by her visit. 7000 police deployed, water cannon on standby. it read her note to the fourth reich. we challenged this woman as to how she could portray her as hitler. because, she said, what is imposed on greece is like a naughty scheme. the vast majority were not anti german but anti austerity. >> look at what is happening here, what the measures are bringing. >> she was given full military honors of the airport. and on her way into the city, her convoy was jeered. with the doctors and nurses trying to block the street. >> she is here to show support for the greek people but on the streets, there is huge restoration. in just five years, this economy has shrunk 23%. just a short distance from where she was meeting, protesters attacked the barricades. for two hours, there were running battles with the police, volleys of tear gas being fired. the greek prime minister if he believed that the visit marked the end of greece's international isolation. >> everybody that the on greece collapsing will lose the bet. greeks are proud people. they deliver support for greece to stand. handoff and despite the fact this is a difficult path, it will prove worthwhile. if you don't get to solve the problems now, they will reoccur later in a much more dramatic way. >> in difficult times lie ahead. greece has to make further savings to qualify for more funding. without it, the country runs out of money in november. they said greece is likely to miss the target. >> for more on the less than hospitable welcome she received just a short time ago, seeing those pictures in the report of people wearing uniforms, it makes you wonder if it is possible for germany and greece to be in the same financial house. >> there are many that would ask that. the intense anti-german feeling, references are not the overwhelming opinion. there are the other greeks that say that he had can't blame germany for our problems, we elected a government that mismanaged the situation and borrowed money that we did not have. that intense animosity is now predominantly felt here. from the government, and open arms welcome. the government is intensely aware that relations have hit new lows within the last few years by this tabloid animosity. the government realizes it needs to reach out to the german government in reset relations. greece depends on german cash, and that sort of extremely strong unity is what you saw today from the greek government. >> you were on the streets of athens, wasn't brave or insensitive? got that as a question of what posts to myself when i got hit by a volley of tear gas earlier in the afternoon which left my eyes streaming data show me with a toxic impact. as i nursed by sore eyes. in those days it was brave, other cell was insensitive. her visit has added fuel to the fire for those that see her as the architect of austerity. they say it is a sign of respect that she came to this country and we're glad that she came to speak to the president offered a show of support and endorse their place in the euro. in rebuilding the credibility abroad, he will be very delighted by her visit today, the first visit in over five years. >> in pakistan, a brave teenage girl that gave international attention for speaking out against them and campaigned for girls to get an education has been shot and seriously wounded. she was on her way home from school when gunmen opened fire on her schoolus, shooting her in the head and neck. she survived and the doctors say she is out of danger. >> liberal that defied the taliban. she was shot at close range for standing up against militants and insisting that girls have the right to go to school. this was her and her beloved classroom when they tried to take it from her. she refused to back down. in 2009, militants controlling the valley decreed that girls' schools must close. then just 11, she voiced her opposition written under a pen name. this was her injury for january 3. >> i was very scared of getting ready for school today because they announced that the girls should stopped going. our teacher told us that if we come, we should not wear a school uniform and where normal clothes. only 11 attended class today. >> after the militants were driven out, they campaigned for recognition for girls. letting the current glut -- recognition and threats. she will fight on if she makes a good recovery. >> she would never give up her education. she will continue to inspire the other folks. that they are going to surrender. >> the threat may not be over. after the attack, they said she was pro-west and will not the spirit. tonight, she is said to be conscious and responsive and hospital with her family by her bedside. how brutal attacks are nothing new here, but the shooting of this young girl has caused horror and revulsion. human rights campaigners say it sends a very disturbing message to anyone campaigning for women and girls. >> and dangerous times for a very brave girl and pakistan. became a mild controversy, jury sandusky who served at penn state university was sentenced to at least 30 years in prison after being found guilty of 45 counts of sexual abuse. the scandal led to a flood of allegations in the tarnished a once revered sports program. >> the disgraced codes that traded his truck sued for prison jumpsuit. he arrived at court, protesting his innocence. he spoke to a college radio station. >> they can take away my life entry as a monster, but they can't take away my heart. in my heart, i know i did not do these alleging disgusting acts. my wife has been on only sex partner and that was after marriage. >> she listened as her husband died of child abuse. he was contradicted by three gunmen that gave emotional accounts of being touched in showers. prosecutors praised the courage of the victims. >> reliving the events, when they were to have the victimization exposed. a one of them could have walked up -- or walk away from this case but they chose to testify truthfully and demonstrated personal courage and the desire to see justice done. >> curious and does he use his prestige to impress vulnerable boys. rityets up a youth chairt that prosecutors called if factory. the 68-year-old fallen hero who will most certainly spend the rest of his left behind bars. >> a quick look at some of the other day's news, israel's prime tester has announced there will be an early general election. the election was due for another year, but he said it would take place as soon as possible. his coalition government has been in power since 2009. the radical clerics has pleaded not guilty. the conspiracy to set up a terrorist training camps inside the united states landed in the u.s. on saturday after a very lengthy legal battle against extradition. the nobel prize in physics has been awarded to scientists have invented different ways to measure and to study quantum particles. it was carried out by a french and american scientists. findings can open the way the superfast computers an incredibly precise clocks. authorities say that the body of one of the country's most brutal drug lords has been snatched from a funeral parlor. it was confirmed that the man that went by the alias the executioner had been killed in a gunfight with marines. >> news from the mexican government's point of view was mixed. they were brought down in a shootout, and after initial doubts, they confirmed that it was definitely the of the drug kingpin of the most wanted men in mexico. >> of the protocols of unidentified bodies, they carried out a comparative analysis of the bodies. the result was confirmed for those of the national fingerprint database. >> what followed was cause for real dismay among the local authorities. the body was snatched from the funeral home where it was being held, presumably members covering the remains of their leader. the government hoped it would be a positive example of the military strategy has only gone to further illustrate the power that they will then states. the outgoing president will doubtless feel pleased that he is no longer a threat in mexico. a deeply frustrated that the authorities don't have the body to show for it. he is now a shadow of their former self and lack a clear leader. >> more outfalls have still to come on tonight's program, we will have the latest on a meningitis outbreak in the u.s. that has left 11 haitians dead. a secret agent that infiltrated the ira on behalf of british security services says he has been abandoned by those who serve here if he testified on the organization and one of the biggest criminal trials in irish and british history. dodge ram and gilmore infiltrated the ira at the height of the trouble in northern ireland. he later earned himself an ira death sentence. >> i have saved countless amounts of lives. gosh living under a false identity for 30 years, he has been filled by the intelligence services. >> i have no financial stability, which i was promised. i have nothing. >> he is now taking his case to the investigatory powers tribunal, a body that examines complaints against the intelligence services. he is still remembered as a traitor, guilty of the trail. unexpected,t come and that when the mi it's done with them, they discard them. >> how they care for it, it is now being employed. >> to invoke trade organizations, where you are in the world, it will always be needed. have the honor your death to them. got to they do not comment on intelligence matters. -- >> did not comment on intelligence matters. >> now to a growing health scare in the united states. contaminated shot has led to an outbreak of meningitis. the 120 cases have fallen ill and 11 people have died. how does the infection occurred? the chair of vendor built preventive medicine department joins me from national, tennessee. i know n.y. is the case with -- the state with the most cases. do you know how this whole contaminated mr. arroyo was brought to the states? >> in came to us from a compound in pharmacy in new england which supplies similar drugs to many states. we happen to have had, from the contaminated batch, a substantial number of doses and we now have a substantial number of patients, unfortunately. >> how rare is it? >> is already naturally acquired in a very uncommon. but in this fashion, to inoculate a contaminated medication immediately adjacent to the central nervous system and have the infection take place that way is almost vanishingly rare. >> and aledo how many there are in the country of these contaminated steroids? >> there were approximately 17,000 vials. yes, 17,000 vials. some patients received more than one inoculation. if there is a silver lining to this very dark cloud, the attack rate, the proportion of people that receive this medication continues to be fortunately quite low. or 1%. it is a large number of people but not as large as it could be. >> they say 13,000 patients have already been exposed to these infected steroids. how do we determine who is at risk of contracting it? >> we have tracked down all the people that receive the medication. they have been put on the alert so if they develop that a symptom that all that could be in any way related to meningitis, they go promptly to their doctors had to be tested. that is how we determine the number of cases. >> what are the symptoms and possible treatments? >> headache, fever, chills, stiff back, nausea, and even stroke-like symptoms. the treatment has to do with a couple of drugs that are challenging to administer. have to be given intravenously and have serious side effects. the have to be taken for a prolonged time like weeks, maybe months. >> does it make you concerned about these zero conditions or lack of sterile conditions that they might produce? dodge we are very seriously concerned about that. the food and drug administration is in the midst of examining all those circumstances. the laboratory has been closed and is no longer shipping medication of any kind. we will wait to see what happens. >> the best of luck for you to be down there. quite alarming prospect there. attempt to set a world record for the highest skydive was abandoned because of poor weather. the high winds prevented him from launching the helium balloon and capsules designed to take him 22 miles above the earth. hope that their plan to free fall will still take place in utah later this week. just four weeks from today, americans will go to the polls and vote for the next president. the commander-in-chief has been followed every step in but not until the obama administration videographer became a fixture at the white house. he has become the first to take of the post and has written about his experiences in a new blood. >> i was handed the world's best set and the world's best cast of characters, all i had to do was hit record. >> what i take away the most from my time is actually not all of the amazing glamorous things that happened, it is ordinary things that can become so much more surreal when you have the lens of the white house. >> 03 of these, these two, five of these seven roles. >> you always go through the back of the elevator and use the service elevator and use backs of kitchens. i really tried the highlight of lovely atmosphere, to show the monday and aspects of this amazing institution. he >> the privilege of a very special guest today so i will let a man. -- him in. >> hey. [applause] >> ip data very young age being my documentary subject the president of the united states. after filming the same person for five years, it is something between meditation and a cruel joke. you can't do the same manhattan over and over again. their fourth one is designed for you to work in 2014/7. it is n ful full of computers and copying machines. i think that is why the burnout rate is very high. every single scrap of everything i take, someone comes their finger and swearers or something is a focus and i talked over a shot, and all those in the national archives. for me, it means that anything i felt like accident and on purpose will be available to the public in five years. think about it, a scary proposition to shoot the leader of the free world on tape so much. everyone knew that barack obama was the kind of person that would not be affected by its, that this is being allowed the happen. >> i know he is tired, but that was one heck of a job. program to aoday's close. you can get updates on our web site and if you would like to reach me, you can find me on twitter. thank you so much for watching, i will see you back again tomorrow. >> make sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> funding for this presentation was made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to understand the industry you operate in, working to nurture new ventures and help provide capital for key strategic decisions. we offer expertise and tailored solutions in a wide range of industries. what can wdoou for y? >> "bbc world news" was presented by kcet, los angeles.
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Oct 26, 2012 12:30am EDT
they do not believe in a public role, clean air, safe food, food, safety, public safety, public education, public health, medicare, medicaid, social security, has no place in a free society, medicare should wither on a vine and very clear about saying that but you remember when we did this, the -- the tarp, they -- in the course of time they didn't believe in regulation, didn't believe in supervision and discipline and when the walls came tumbling down they didn't believe in intervention, we had overwhelmingly the votes to pass the tarp bill for president bush. for our country. we didn't say to him, you are on your own, baby, well to save the national -- >> rose: i will never forget -- >> we will not have an economy -- remember i told you that. >> rose: paulson came to your office and said that. >> well, ben bernanke said, hank paulson described it. >> rose: ben bernanke said -- >> if we do not act immediately we will not have an economy by monday. now, since i have been telling that story, people have come to me and said, we are all seeing runs on our institutions and the rest of that, people pulling out, and it was a very dangerous situation. and the republicans weren't even there for president -- imagine what they would have phone to president obama under the situation. president obama would not have gotten us in that fix in the first place but it is an interesting election. i really think that, you know, who knows, it is all turnout, it is the polls are goofy, i mean one day i will have a candidate be five points up and the next poll, eight points down, you are like, well how could this be, you know, well let's split the difference and call it an even race, but how can these polls be so all over the map, same thing as you said with the real estate, there is who way that the gender gap -- how could they be for romney? how could women be for romney? person hood? he doesn't know if he would sign lilly led better. >> .. paycheck fairness. binders. i mean, how could women vote for romney? >> rose: thank you for comi pleare toto see you. see you next time.i/w captioning sponsored by rose communications captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org >> rose: funding for charlie rose has been provided by the coca-cola company, supporting this program since 2002. and american express. additional funding provided by these funders. and by bloomberg, a provider of multiple media news and information services worldw tavis: good evening. from los angeles, i am tavis smiley. tonight a conversation with allyson felix. she electrified the track world this summer with her performance at the 200 meters, capturing gold in the event following a disappointing second place finish in beijing. the continued problem of doping and the landmark decision that level the playing field. we are glad you could join us for conversation with olympic star allyson felix, coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as w twoe ogether, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: allyson felix is one of the most decorated female track stars in recent history. she had a standout performance at the london games. she set the world record on one of the marquee olympic events and is also an advocate on a number of important issues including childhood obesity. good to have you on this program. are you doing all right? >> i am good. tavis: let's do this right quick, bam. these things are heavy. i love this. these are very, very heavy. >> they are heavier than you would expect. tavis: i would be like this. [laughter] tavis: how did it feel to finally get that monkey off your back? >> it was amazing. i felt a mixture of joy and relief at the same time. finally i can say i have done it. tavis: a lot of folks, not necessarily in competition, but in life, when you find yourself in a rut or in a situation where you cannot seem to push beyond it. in your case, losing to the same person, two olympics in a row. tell me about the mental process you had to go through of getting beyond losing to the same person in two consecutive olympic games. >> it is biblical. i don't think i ever really got over it. that is what made me work so hard over the last four years. you feel like you have made some progress, and then you do run faster, but the new are against that person again. it is difficult to pick up and decide to keep going on, and you see progress being made. tavis: how did your training regimen change? it was clear to us your focusing more this time. >> definitely. through the last four years, i explore other options. i tried id atde run the 100 to do well in the 200. i got inhegh w tteid the weighd just did everything i could to make sure i would be in the best position to run the four hundred. tavis: i know the joke about chicken legs. they used to call you chicken legs. it will not go away. i finally got it, and the announcer said, chicken legs got it. tavis: how much can you lead press now? >> i used to be able to lead press 700 pounds. it was tough, but i am competitive. tavis: i thought my leg press was a decent, but 700, that is pretty impressive. i was fascinated by just watching the coverage, but you come from a family where your mother and father are persons of the an abiding faith. your father gets up in front of the whole church and says i don't care how many metals, if it is not about jesus, and all that. how has that aided and abetted your professional, your athletic life? >> is the only thing i know. i grew up in the church. i am a person of faith. i definitely feel like i have a gift to run, and my whole goal is to use it to the best of my ability. it just makes sense that i come from a family that is so involved in the church. my mom has such great faith, and like you said, i call her before every race and i pray. it is just peace of mind. it is great to have this race, but life is such a bigger picture than that. i want to run for eternal glory, but that is what did that is not what life is all about. tavis: i was on the track team in college. i was on the speech team and the debate team. before every tournament, my mom and i would have prayer on the phone. i always wondered if my opponent was on the phone with her mom. >> the prayer is not necessarily to win, but let me you -- let me be used in whatever way the lord sees fit. that is what is all about. tavis: how do you think you can best be used with all these metals and all the accolades, how can you be used, particularly in a field that has been so burned with illegal and rampant drug use now, the lance mstrong story is in the news every day. >> i try to be a positive light in that situation. i, myself, have been frustrated. it is a hard thing when you are out there working every day to know that someone else's cheating, and that may not necessarily get caught. you have to be ok with may be getting second sometime just because of the state of four sports are at. but i can be of voice and use my platform. helping young persons, is really important for them to understand how to do things the right way, not just in sports, but in life in general. i think you have suspicions, you don't want to ever accuse anyone, but yes. tavis: i only raise that because at one. , i remember reading the story of a particular woman who felt that lance armstrong was the devil incarnate. the things he said and did, and i don't know where the true lines are, i am just saying what i read in the paper, with regard to trying to keep secret what he and his teammates were doing. he still will not come out and knowledge that. i raise that go back to the comment of what it feels like to run against someone you know is cheating. the woman talked about what she endured and what lance and others put her through, and how all these years nobody believed her, and she lost her job and she was just crushed. now, years later, the truth is finally coming out, and she feels a sense of redemption, but i am sympathetic to her story, but i think about the other guys. there were some guys who were doing in clean, doing it right. they are looking at lance and others who are beating them and they cannot say nothing about it. have your survive in a sport -- you have to be ok with coming in second or third? >> you have to know why you are doing it. you have to not stoop to that level. you have to be ok with knowing that is going on, and is something that is so frustrating. there are a lot of cases where you can look at somebody and now you are huge. can see it with your eyes, but you are not getting caught, so it is hard. you have to go out there and work hard and say my integrity is that important to me. that is somewhere i am not going to go. >> there is always an opportunity -- dr. king used to always say the time is always ripe to do it right. i would think if ever there were some time, the time is now. i am wondering what sense do you have that people like you -- this is a new generation. you will be 30, that is old and track. >> it is. tavis: you will be pushing at 30 no. by the time the next olympics rolls around. you think it is possible for track stars to get change the area, to turn the story? >> i hope so. i am trying to get through to the kids of the next generation because it definitely lies in the decisions they make. i am very hopeful that in rio, maybe it will be less of a problem. tavis: you said you pray with your mother before these races and the prayer is not to win, but to do your best, whatever the outcome may be. tell me about the pressure, what brings on a steroid use and other enhancements in sports, it isn't the pressure that people feel to win by any means necessary? they just want to win, because the pressure is there, the sponsors are pushing, the coaches are pushing. talk about how you navigate that level of pressure. >> the pressure it is hard. the act world is only watching every four years and a lot of people feel like they have to win in that timeframe. for me, there is a lot of expectations, and you want to be able to live up to them. i just try to take it day by day. i was just more at peace this time around, whether i would win or lose, i am going to go out and giving everything i have. that is how i try to deal with expectations. tavis: there are some folks who, if they don't succeed, they don't win on the larger stage, and if they do that twice, they might not come back. what kept you coming back? >> i never let track define me. it is what i do and what i love, but i think i have and other things i am passion about and interested in, it helps me to come back. it helped me to have renewed love for the sport by being able to step away and then come back. having two silver medals, there is no more motivation than that. that was the driving force. i am super competitive and i just wanted another opportunity to get back out there. tavis: that as much as i love jackee, i would not want to be coached by bob kersey. mall will push you -- bob will push you. how do you navigate having a coach of his guilt? >> jackee helped me. she has been through worse than i have. there been. times the have had to get on the phone and call her and say what do i do? he is demanding, and he yells and screams and demands excellence of you. but that is what makes him so genius. every genius has a little bit of insanity, and he is no different. he has so much wisdom. tavis: now that you have this acclaim, we know you are passionate about children. in the long term, what do you want to do with this platform that you have? >> i also have a passion for kids that way. i have a degree in elementary education, and now what is heavy on my heart is finding -- just the amount of time i spend in classrooms and seeing the drastic changes from even when i was a kid, and the amount activity that is going on is something i definitely think we have to do something about, and the time is now. it is an urgent situation. tavis: what most concerns about the state of america's children today? >> the health issue. it is now normal thing that our kids are spending so much time in school where they are moving -- not moving at all. they have diseases that we see an older people, and it is just frightening. this is the first generation that will live five years less than their parents. when i hear that, it is just mind-boggling. who wants their child to have a shorter like expectancy than themselves? tavis: obviously the olympics is always about the cream of the crop. do you think the obesity issue that is so rampant with our kids might have some long-term effect on our national competitiveness down the road? >> i think it definitely does. of course. kids are not even exploring the option of sports anymore. they don't even know what they could do. i was not read to be an olympian. i did not start running until high school, and i just doubled up on it. if i was not active and involved in different sports and just moving around, i would not have known i had the potential to become an olympian. i know there are other stories like that out there. it is very important to be active and healthy. tavis: how did you come to running so late? >> i was playing basketball, i was in gymnastics. i am doing pretty much everything but running. i was that a new school and i went out to meet new people. after the first year, i fell in love with the sport and it was kind of a whirlwind. tavis: you were doing everything except running, so what do you make of that discovery? >> i had to find it myself. i had to see what i was in joining, what i was passionate about. i am grateful for that experience. so many things in life are a journey, and i was able to find that. >> there is a lesson for parents. so often parents push their kids, but your parents allow you to discover that on your own. >> that is something parents have to understand. even if their child is not showing athletic excellence in a certain sport, they still need to be involved. it does not have to be a military type of setting. they just need to get out and play and enjoy themselves and find it in themselves. tavis: you finished your degree at usc, but we live in a world where its emphasis is on everything but education. how important was it to you to make sure you finished your work? >> it was extremely important. i come from a family of educators. i was not going to survive if i did not finish. i promised my dad i would, and i did it at the same time i was competing in international track. it was tough, but i was fortunate enough to be a will to get it done. tavis: where the u.s. team was concerned, there were more women in this olympics than ever before. 44% was the number competing in the olympics. i think i wrote this down. yes, women in london, 44% participants, the most ever women. 29 out of 46 gold medals won by the u.s.. >> we did not go in there really talking about it our knowing it was going to happen, but i have heard so my stories about g girls watching the olympics and being inspired by it. that iyo what it is all about. this is a huge anniversary for title 9. the i your sense of how field is or is not being leveled for women's sports across the board? >> the metaphor driving force in college athletics, i am just so grateful for how far we have come. i think it is just amazing on this anniversary to be able to see what was done at the olympics just because of that. tavis: i mentioned that you spent some time with president clinton lately. do you like these platforms, to be able to speak, are you comfortable with that or are you getting comfortable with that? >> i am getting comfortable with it. it is such an opportunity to be able to speak about things and be passionate about it. and to hopefully have some influence on things. it is something i do enjoy doing and i am passionate about the causes, so that makes it easy. tavis: i have been reading a lot lately about the union that the runners are trying to get. tell me what this is about and the reason for. clue me in about this union. >> coming together in trying to have a voice. a lot of decisions have been made and a lot of athletes feel we did not have enough representation. it is just about having someone at the table when these big decisions are being discussed. that is what we have come together to do. tavis: you will be right at 30 s in rio. are you going to try to do this again? >> i am going to try to do it again. i am still just really enjoying what i am doing and very passionate about it. i feel like i am in my prime, and i am going to get a shot. >> the games are four years from now, so take me through a four- year journey. when will you start to ramp up again ? take me from now to rio. >> i go back to training in a few weeks and i will be preparing for the 2013 world championships in russia. we have those in 2013, and then have an off year. our season is in europe. it is, like golf when you go on tour, you go from place to place and you are repeating -- you are competing with the exact same people that are in the olympics. then the next year we will help world shipping chips again, and the cycle keeps going. before you know it, it will be time to gear up for the olympic trials and do it all over again. each year you are preparing yourself for the olympics and building on the basics you have from the previous year. tavis: we read every day in the paper about what michael phelps is making for endorsements. i am not talking numbers, but you make a pretty good living doing this? >> i am blessed to be able to do that. sponsors,ot of great boxer from 92 gatorade. -- from nike to gatorade. i have been blessed to be able to make a living doing what i love. tavis: i want to go back to your parents now. obviously they are proud of you and all of that, but how do they feel about all this success? >> they are very, very proud of me. it to see mey walking with the lord. it always comes back to the reason why you do it. this is great. tavis: so that europe 2014 when you have a year off, does that mean for a whole year you will not talk to bobbie? >> it is just a year without a major championship, but i still talk to bobby on a daily basis. tavis: bobby did his job. >> that is why we deal with the craziness. tavis: i got way too comfortable holding these things. i have been talking for 30 minutes. congratulations. >> thank you for having me. tavis: come back anytime. that is our show for tonight. thanks for tuning in. until next time, keep the faith. >> for more information on today's show, visit tavis smiley at pbs.org. tavis: hi, i'm tavis smiley. join me next time for a conversation with salman khan on his unique ideas about how to better educate kids around the world. that is next time. we will see you then. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work toget w stamp hunger out. stamp hunger out.
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Oct 18, 2012 12:00am EDT
tavis: good evening. from los angeles, i am tavis smiley. tonight, we continue our road to health series with one of the most overlooked aspects of health care, the doctor-patient relationship. dr. peter ubel is a scientist at duke university, who looks at how decisions are made and why. communications may hold the key for health care. his new book is called "critical decisions." we are glad you could join us with dr. peter ubel. right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> the california endowment. health happens in neighborhoods. learn more. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: dr. peter ubel is a widely respected scientist and physicians at duke university. his latest text is called "critical decisions." doctor, good to have you on this program. >> good to be here. tavis: i should have put a darker blue tie on. my apologies to you and all of the good folks at duke. it seems to me that so often when doctors and patients get together, what they are talking about, doctor, are life and death decisions. tell me how honesty, how transparency, how open this enters the room in a setting like that -- how open this -- openness enters the room in a setting like that. how do we get to where that is central in a conversation? >> i actually think that most of the time, it is pretty honest and transparent, but often in a foreign language, where the physician is doing their best to explain what is going on to be patient, but they are using jargon that they had to go to medical school to understand. whether they talk too fast or too slow -- that is pretty much the norm. tavis: there was a point in this country years ago, as you know, where at least we were told that we were making a paradigm shift in the health profession, where patients had more say, a patient's right to x, y, and z, and as i read the book, it seems like we have failed in that. >> we empowered patients, but we did not tell them what it meant if they were alone to make the decision, so we started the revolution, but we have not completed it. tavis: your book is full of anecdotes and personal stories. it is always difficult. i think it is necessary and valuable to empower people with information that can help them live better lives. i say all of the time that if -- your't got yhour health, you ain't got anything. let's go inside the text of "critical decisions." sell everyday people can increase it and understand it. -- so everyday people can embrace it and understand it. >> we did not have written language for a long time, but there are a lot of stories in the book. over all, -- overall, i try to say. i start the story with 1975, when a woman was told that she had a lump in her breast and that she needed to have it removed, and she went to get the biopsy, and she woke up at the end of the surgery, not only was the biopsy done, but her breast was removed, the surrounding tissue, what was called a radical mastectomy, even though the position that there was a new study coming out -- even though the physician knew that there was a new study coming out questioning that. that was a president's wife. just 20 years later, i got an emergency call. i am not a surgeon. i was in on call ethicisit, and a woman had cancer -- i was an on-call ethicisit. she had a throat cancer, and they had planned to remove the tumor. when they got in there, there was more tumor than they thought there would be, and he knew that removing the tumor would remove her ability to speak, so he said, "what should i do?" what do you think? i am asking you. so she is asleep on the operating room, in he can go in and take out the rest of the tumor -- and he can go in and take out the rest of the tumor. he could let her wake up, and they would talk about it, and if they went to do it a few weeks later, -- i said, "you need to wake her up." tavis: i said communicate. all right. do you think that that is the norm, or is that the exception to the rule >> doctors are more aware that some decisions are not just medical decisions. they are of value decisions. but it is not the norm. we are struggling, trying to figure out how to work together, and that is what i am trying to help us do better. tavis: there is this old adage in business that the customer is always right. i get what we mean when we say that, but that is not always true. the customer is not always right, and you get it. so i ask you, is the patient always right? it is my body. if it is what i what, am i always right? >> no. my job as a physician is to understand if what you're telling me reflects some deep valleys. that is great. i need to know that, but there may be some misinformation. maybe you decided you do not want to have that procedure done because you hate surgery, and, "i will never feel good because you have to remove part of my leg," but there are some the -- some that do great. tavis: what about this quagmire? it has to do with some positions, not all, who are pushing procedures for a variety of reasons, because they are using this particular equipment or medicine or whatever happens, but i can think of a couple of times in my life where even my own doctors, i have gone to get second opinions. at one point, i was going in for a particular surgery, and i thought, you know what? i am going to pass on that. the date was set, and things were ready to rock-and-roll, and i am glad i did. it took some time to heal. but i did not want to get my foot caught on and that. -- my foot cut on and all of that. what about this idea of doctors being pushed to do x, y, and z. >> i believe doctors believe in what they do. if you have a slow-growing prostate cancer, you might get surgery to treat that, or you might get radiation. if you go to a surgeon, they will probably recommend that you get surgery. if you go to another, you might get that. they spend their day curing people with these treatments, and the cannot imagine any other treatment. tavis: i do not recall you talking specifically about this, but as a person of color, it is important to me, and that is the breakdown i have seen so many times over a lack of cultural confidence, it just not trained on how to communicate, navigate the relationship with patients from different communities, different norms, different values, different understandings. it is a real issue. >> it is. and i think the more you can relate to your position, the better off you are going to be. there are age differences. i am 50 years of them. i started medicine at 27 years old. i looked really, really young. i was taking care of a man in his fifties, and he said, "people of our age." and i thought, i am only 27, but that was one of the biggest compliments of my career. tavis: so rate for me, if you will, on a scale of 1 to 10 how we are doing? -- how we are doing. >> i think we went from 0 to 6 or 7, and we were inching along a little bit. communicating better. there are things called the decision aids that got us up to 6 or so. tavis: what is holding us back? why are we stuck? >> part of why i tell a lot of stories in the book is to let people visualize what might happen to them. "i remember that. you can get confused, and the doctor does not realize that." it is getting people ready for when they have those critical decisions to make. i put in some more information that is not as relevant to some readers. tavis: i just ask a question, for example, about cultural competence. retrainren't to positions, what are two or three ways -- if we were to we trained physicians, what are two or three ways -- if we were to retrain physicians? >> including critiquing them. stepping back and watching yourself interact. there is research showing doctors dramatically improve their behavior if they can see or hear themselves. tavis: how much of this is about patients becoming their own best advocates? >> the right choice is not a medical thing. ultimately, it might be a trade- off between length of life and quality of life. it is like a waiter giving you a recommendation. we have to know what you care about to give you a good recommendation. tavis: what advice in regards to patients becoming their best advocates, and we have to prepare patients to be prepared, so talk to me about how a patient feels empowered to walk into his or her doctor's office and have the kind of conversation that needs to be had -- >> maybe your spouse is not so shy. maybe he or she will jump in there for you. maybe it is your kid. that is one thing. bring someone in. another one is to arm yourself with information before you get to the counter so that you are just up to speed as much as you can be with your situation. tavis: where do you find that patients are most lacking when it comes to information about their own health? >> that is a good question. it varies so much. some people come in, and they are practically encyclopedic, but they are not in touch with their own emotions. medical decisions often carry a lot of emotions. they are afraid of needles. "can you try the neva once or twice and see if it bothers you -- can you try the needle once or twice and see if it bothers you?" tavis: how much this has to deal with patients being emotional, and i want to ask you that, because if ever there is something to be emotional about, it is about your health. but from the physicians side of the coin, how frustrating is it offrom the physicians' side the coin how frustrating is it? >> i think there are times when you have to realize you have to let the emotions come down and then come back another day and try again. sometimes, we physicians have been there and done that that we forget what it is like for a patient. we say, "you have a very small, localized cancer. do not worry. it is no big deal." but to the patient, they hear "cancer," and nothing after that. do not just assume that he knows what you are thinking and feeling. tavis: this is, again, something not covered in your text, but it is personal, a personal ax to grind, and i grind this ax due to personal interest, but also because i am a personality. i am ushered in the back door, and they get to me rather quickly. that is not all of the time. that is not always the case. i have in my life been sent to see a specialist, and i get to the specialist, and they do not know me from adam. it is not my personal physician, and i have found myself sitting in waiting rooms and the rat race. it is not something covered directly in your text, but i wonder how much of this relationship is with patients being made to feel like they are just another number, they are -- if i get to your office on time, do not make me sit for 1.5 hours to two hours, or rush me when i get in there. i am trying to figure out, any other relationship, you want to feel like you are respected, and you want to feel like you matter. there are people who are watching right now who know exactly. they understand this. how much of that impact is this? -- impacts this? you guys are the worst. and then you get overcharged. again, i am grinding mine ax. -- my ax. it is horrible. >> i really work hard to stick to my schedule. there are days where i was late. and that was because someone had a really big problem, and i had to work with the emergency room, and the first and i would do is to apologize profusely. -- the first thing i would do is to apologize profusely. not everybody does that. if you do not get a good response from your doctor, maybe it is time to find another one. tavis: you mentioned that at one point, you worked with the v.a. system. how do we do as a nation dealing with those who served? there are some thoughts about how we treat these soldiers when they are coming home. tell me how you think we are doing in the v.a. system. >> as you read in the news, there are certain that have -- there are some that have problems. now we are ramping of the mental health services, and we are not doing it fast enough. but we are ramping up -- we are ramping up mental health services, and we are not doing it fast enough. it often does as well or better than other places people are getting their care. we sometimes have things years before others. to make sure when i order a medication, if it conflicts with another medicine you are on, i get a warning. i think on average, outstanding care. tavis: since you raised it, what about digital records, and the concerns some patients might have? >> you are not talking like this as a doctor, you are talking like this, so i think a good physician, they take that computer monitor, and they turn it over, and they say, "look at how your blood pressure is going up," and it is a learning model. i think it can be a real way to improve communication. tavis: our population, as you well know as a physician, is aging. what is the relationship between the two? >> older people, they just defer to their doctors, and younger people -- that is partly true. it is amazing when you get a sudden illness. all of a sudden, you are so scared. i had a bulging disk in my back. -- disc in my back. when i had my own back problem, i did not go to the library once. it is amazing. when it is your body on the line. tavis: this debate we have had recently about health care. and if mr. romney were to win, they want to do what they can to overturn obamacare and whatever that means. the supreme court has weighed in on some aspects of this. the issues raised in the text? >> a complicated topic. no matter who is elected in november and who is president in january, people are going to have what they call more skin in the game. we are paying more than enough pockets for health care than we ever have had. -- we are paying more than ever out of pocket for health care. "it is really costing me a lot of money, dr.." -- doctor." tavis: there is a reason they call it "the practice of medicine at." sometimes, the right decision is not made, because doctors are not perfect. again, that is why they call it the practice of medicine, so what do you say to patients when the right decision was not made? >> you know, you cannot live your life in reverse, right? you just have to go forward with what the next decision is and how to get on with your life. living with regret, i do not see the point of it. if you realize it was a bad decision, you might want to change physicians or at least know what you are upset with what happens. tavis: the book is called "critical decisions," written by dr. peter ubel. good to have you on the program. thank you for your insights. that is our show for tonight. you can download our app. thanks for watching, and as always, keep the faith. captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org-- >> for more information on today's show, visit tavis smiley at pbs.org. tavis: hi, i'm tavis smiley. join me next time for a conversation with comedian d.l. hughley. that is next time. we will see you then. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> the california endowment. health happens in neighborhoods. learn more. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> be more. >> be more. pbs.
WETA
Oct 18, 2012 6:00pm EDT
estimated to have taken part. our correspondent was at one such a drought in los angeles. >> you are joining millions of californians. >> the mayor of los angeles hiding under a table. an earthquake drill without the shaking. at 10:18, schools and government offices joined the great shakeout. millions of people across america went through the motions of what would happen if an earthquake struck. >> we know the earthquake is inevitable. we can estimate what the damages are going to be. if people take responsibility for their personal safety, we could change the outcome. >> the city of san francisco was struck by an earthquake of frightening proportions. >> one of the most catastrophic earthquakes was in 1906 when thousands of people died in san francisco. today is the anniversary of the 1989 quake which brought down freeways. earthquakes are part of life here, but the scientists keyboarding the big one -- keep warning that the big one is long overdue. >> it is all about raising awareness. that was a simulation. it was very intense. it could be up to two minutes and that would cause a
WETA
Oct 4, 2012 12:00pm EDT
this evening from new york, denver los angeles and washington. president obama and governor romney faced off tonight in the first of three debates before election day on november 6th. domestic policy was in focus during the 90-minute showdown at the university of denver. the platform gave govern romney an opportunity to reignite his campaign which has suffered some this summer. they sparred across a range of issues. >> there's a various done of small businesses across the country saying what's the effect of obamacare in your hiring plans. three quarters said it makes us less likely to hire people. i just don't know how the president could come into office, facing 23 million people out of work, rising unemployment and economic crises at the kitchen table, and spend his energy and passion for two years fighting for obamacare instead of fighting for jobs for the american people. >> the irony is that we've seen this model work really well, in massachusetts. because govern romney did a good thing, working with democrats in the state to set up what is essentially the identical model, and
WETA
Oct 16, 2012 12:00pm EDT
predecessors were. he gets that. if you see him in the crowd in los angeles watching a baseball game he almost looks like a plausible participant in the politics we know. >> rose: and had experience in america, too. i >> he did. he went to iowa and spent time there. >> rose: so only seven members that rule the committee. nine >> there's nine now. >> rose: nine and they're reducing it to seven. why? >> part of the idea is the leadership has gotten diffused across so many people. there's so many different voices in the room running the country it's almost impossible to get anything done. which sounds funny to us because we think of china as getting things don't efficiently but they have not taken the steps of economic reform people want them to take, reduced the role of the state-owned enterprises and boost consumption, get away from the old model. >> rose: and state owned enterprise versus private owned enterprise according people from china who come here who own chinese private companies. >> that's right. it's a hard place to be a private entrepreneur. 50% of the economy is dominated by
WETA
Oct 15, 2012 7:00pm EDT
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> woodruff: the presidential puieictorerepaord mostly out of tomorrow's town hall debate, as a blitz of political ads continued to dominate the airwaves. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> suarez: and i'm ray suarez. on the newshour tonight, npr's peter overby analyzes the big money behind the ad wars. >> woodruff: plus we have two takes on close congressional contests, starting with gwen ifill's report from the bay state. >> ifill: we're in massachusetts where the race for the senate seat once held by ted kennedy has become a surprising and expensive dead heat. and an unusual race to the ideological middle. >> suarez: stu rothenberg and susan page offer up other senate matchups to watch. >> woodruff: then, we update the conflict in syria amid reports that weapons have landed in the hands of militants linked to al qaeda. >> suarez: publicity stunt or scientific achievement? hari sreenivasan talks to miles o'brien about yesterday's supersonic freefall. >> woodruff: and kwame holman remembers arlen specter, the independently minded pennsylvania senator who served as both a republican and a democrat. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> computing surrounds us. sometimes it's obvious and sometimes it's very surprising in where you find it. soon, computing intelligence in unexpected places will change our lives in truly profound ways. technology can provide customized experiences tailored to individual consumer preferences, igniting a world of possibilities from the inside out. sponsoring tomorrow, starts today. >> bnsf railway. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: president obama and mitt romney spent this day getting ready for their second debate, where questions will come directly from voters. as they did, new polls underscored what's riding on the outcome. from the obama and romney camp came signs of just how high the stakes will be tomorrow night. republican vice presidential candidate paul ryan talked up the coming confrontation as he campaigned in cincinatti. >> these debates are giving us the ability to cut through the clutter and give people a very clear choice. that's what we're offering. ( cheers and applause ) >> woodruff: and president obama issued a new fund-raising appeal saying this race is tied. a new abc news/"washington post" poll of likely voters found the president led 49% to 46%. but that was within the margin of error. and the poll found romney now leads in the level of enthusiasm among his supporters. the president hoped to reverse that trend as he hunkered down in williams burg, virginia, to prepare. on sunday his top advisor david axle rod told fox news that mr. obama will make some adjustments to the approach he took in the first debate. >> i mean, we saw governor romney sort of serially walk away from his own proposals and certainly the president is going to be willing to challenge him. >> woodruff: mitt romney was doing his debate homework in boston but advisor told cnn on sunday that he expects a different president obama on tuesday up to a point >> well, the president can change his style. he can change his tactics. he can't change his record and he can't change his policies. that's what this election is about >> woodruff: the candidates face off tomorrow night at hofstra university in hempstead, new york. >> suarez: late today, mitt romney announced he raised more than $170 million in september, and said that his campaign and republican national committee had $191 million in the bank at the end of the month. those efforts are boosted by spending from outside groups. according to newshour partner kantar media/cmag, groups opposing the president and supporting romney in the general election alone have run record numbers of television commercials. that's more than 41,000 spots o from american crossroads; more fran 43,000 spots from americans foriprpeosty; and 45,000 spots from the restore our future super pac. backing president obama, the super pac priorities usa action was the only democratic- affiliated group to come close. priorities has run nearly 40,000 spots. here are the two spots with the most money behind them from each campaign. >> i'm an independent. i voted for him. i contributed to him. governor romney promised he would bring jobs to this state. by the he left office we had fallen to 37th in the nation. he cares about big business and tax cuts for wealthy people. i certainly do not believe that he cares about my hard-working employees. i feel like i was duped by mitt romney. i'm going to vote for president obama. >> priorities usa action is responsible for the content of this advertising >> this is what president obama said the jobless rate would be if we pass a stimulus. 5.6%. but this is what the jobless rate actually is. 8.1%. the difference? about 3.7 million jobs. obama's spending drove us $5 trillion deeper in debt. now we have fewer jobs than when he started. what obama promised versus what he delivered >> american crossroads is responsible for the content of this advertising. >> suarez: the newshour >> suarez: the newshour is working with cmag and national public radio for this series of reports examining advertising spending. joining us now is npr correspondent peter overby, who took a look at super pacs. for almost 20 years you've been covering the way money drives politics in america. a lot of money is being spent this time around. how much? do we know? >> well, the group of ads that we looked at, all the broadcast ads from april through the first week of october, about a half billion dollars worth of ads which is just phenomenal >> suarez: roughly equally by the two campaigns or is one outspending the other? >> the obama campaign and its allies are somewhat outspending the romney campaign and its allies. but not by that much. >> suarez: the independent groups, have they been coordinating ad buys with each other? they can't talk to the campaigns. but they're allowed to talk to each other. has that made a difference? >> yeah. the independent group action is almost entirely on the republican side. that's because the romney campaign had lean months, and the independent groups with their unlimited contributions coming in were able to make up for that. the best example of the coordination was between crossroads g.p.s. and americans for prosperity. they basically were trading weeks. one would be on the air for a few weeks and then the other would be on the air for a few weeks. the result was that they almost always had at least a million dollars worth of ads running, sometimes much more than that at a time when the romney campaign was essentially off the air. >> suarez: so they were able to maintain the romney campaign's presence even when governor romney was having trouble raising money for his campaign >> exactly. both these groups are 501c-4. that means they don't disclose their donors. this is a significant amount of money in a presidential campaign coming from unidentified donors >> suarez: is there a difference in what's being stressed because karl rove is one kind of political mind and the brothers have a different agenda. when you look at the ads, is there a different flavor to the two sets of appeals? >> not so much. the crossroads organization is really staffed with people who are interested in furthering the republican party's goals. and the coke brothers are the americans for prosperity is a coke brothers organization, grass roots, heavy emphasis on economom issues. but... and they're often rivals these two groups. but here they are united in attacking obama. all the ads they've done have been attack ads. >> suarez: there's a whole different infrastructure that stands around different kinds of money. if you give money to a party, it's one kind of money. if you give money to one of these groups it's another kind of money. if you give money directly to a campaign it's another kind. with most of the independent spending being on the romney side and most of the party and campaign spending being on the obama side, is there an advantage or a disadvantage to having a lot of one kind of money and not so much of another? >> there's a definite advantage. on the democratic side, about 91% of the spending is done by the obama campaign itself. that shows you partly how weak the outside groups are in the democratic side. but also it shows the success of the obama fund-raising operation with the small donors they can keep going back to again and again. when romney's problem was that he didn't have a lot of small donors, he tended to get donors who maxed out, gave the maximum the first time that they contributed. so he had to find new donors. the outside groups make up for that because they can raise these unlimited contributions to disclose their contributions, their contributors, the 501c-4 groups do not. but, you know, you have groups supporting romney that have received $10 million contributions >> suarez: once you max out, arguably on the romney campaign side, you can pivot and start giving money to one of the independent groups, right? >> yes, yes. you can see that in the contribution records to restore our future, the pro romney super pac which again has disclosed its donors. romney donors that are giving to the c-4s, we don't know. >> suarez: peter overby, good to see you >> thanks, glad to be here suarez: you can listen >> suarez: you can listen to peter's reports and see our examination of the spending data on our politics page. >> woodruff: we have more politics coming up, including the hard-fought massachusetts senate race, and other congressional contests to watch; plus, new clashes in the syrian city of aleppo; the record- breaking sky jump; and the legacy of arlen specter. but first, the other news of the day. here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: two americans won the 2012 nobel prize in economics today for research on market design and matching. it affects everything from placing doctors in the right hospitals to pairing students with the schools they most want. the honorees are alvin roth of harvard university, and currently a visiting professor at stanford university, and lloyd shapley, a professor emeritus at the university of california los angeles. wall street had a strong start to the week on news of rising retail sales and better-than- expected earnings at citigroup. the dow jones industrial average gained 95 points to close at 13,424. the nasdaq rose 20 points to close at 3064. a 14-year-old pakistani girl who was shot by a taliban gunman was flown to england today for medical treatment. we have a report from lindsey hilsum of independent television news. >> reporter: the ambulance drove slowly from birmingham airport. inside the girl was still sedated as she has been since the taliban bullet penetrated her skull. doctors from the queen elizabeth hospital who were already in pakistan have been attending to her. they believe she has a reasonable chance of recovery in the unit which has treated thousands of soldiers injured in iraq and afghanistan. she left the military hospital this morning flying to the u.k. via dubai. >> she is an inspirational example to young people. it was a cowardly attack on her and her school friends trying to retaliate for her own campaign for good access to education for girls in pakistan. >> reporter: yesterday in krawchy, thousands demonstrated against the shooting. the crowds organized by one of pakistan's political parties, the n.q.m., but despite claims that the attack has united pakistanis, the islamist party who frequently stage protests against america have not come out on the streets to support the teenager. they've named a school after the girl. a generation of girls who will never get an education if the taliban prevail. the tipping point. the fate of the girl has come to symbolize the choice pakistan faces. it can let the extremists have their way or reject them and everything they stand for.pe >> sreenivasan: in another development, more than 100 militants attacked a pakistani police station overnight south of peshawar. the incident triggered a gun battle that raged for several hours. at least six policemen were killed, including two who were beheaded. a dozen others were wounded. in the philippines, muslim rebels agreed to a peace pact with the government after decades of fighting. the framework deal will give the muslim minority broad autonomy in the south of the mostly roman catholic nation. in exchange, the rebels must end all violence. the pact was signed in manila's presidential palace. the country's president and the leader of the rebels spoke afterward. >> good day. we extend the hand of friendship to the president and the people. we embark on the historic journey to rebuild our homeland. >> much work remains to be done in order to fully reap the fruits of this framework agreement. we have commitments and goals to achieve. >> sreenivasan: one al-qaeda- linked group, abu sayyaf, has not been part of the peace process. but negotiators said they hope the agreement will isolate the extremists. the u.s. food and drug administration has widened a warning about medicines made by a specialty pharmacy near boston. the new england compounding center sold tainted steroids linked to an outbreak of fungal meningitis. as of today, there were 212 cases nationwide, and at least 15 deaths. now the f.d.a. says it's investigating other illnesses that may be tied to the company's products. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to ray. >> suarez: and we return to politics. the battle lines are drawn in this year's massachusetts senate race, where a republican incumbent is looking to survive in a blue state. gwen ifill has our report. >> yeah, yeah, ifill: for nine years ray flynn a staunch life-long democrat was the mayor of boston. this year he's working to re-elect a republican, scott brown. >> i see him with the veterans. he sits there and has a beer with the veterans and talks over all the issues. they love him for it. >> your u.s. senator scott brown ifill: in 2010 brown won the senate seat once held by ted kennedy by playing up his blue collar labor union roots, touring around the state in a pick-up truck and making a direct appeal to the state's independent voters >> i don't think people really identify with scott brown as a republican. i think they look at him as somebody who can really bring people together. you know what? his story is the story of most of the people that live in this community. ( cheers and applause ) >> ifill: then there's tom menino, boston's current and longest serving mayor. he waited until just a few weeks ago to endorse fellow democrat elizabeth warren, but now he's counting on the harvard law professor to beat brown at his own game. >> just one of those phenomenons in this business where scott caught everybody off guard. he worked hard and he won. i think this time everybody understands that he's a very good retail politician. they're all watching and working harder than they ever have in the past. i've never seen folks more enthusiastic about a campaign than the elizabeth warren campaign >> ifill: the disagreement between menino and flynn reflects the stakes in a hard-fought and increasingly nasty senate campaign. the nation's most expensive. warren came to national prominence when she ran the panel that oversaw the national troubled asset relief program or tarp with close ties to president obama and to liberal fund-raisers, her campaign announced today she's raised nearly $37 million, much of it from out of state. >> i'll vote for you hope so fill: brown was known to praise mr. obama and joe biden as well. he's raised more than $28 million. brown tells supporters that warren is not what she says she is. >> she says we need to invest in this and that. with all due respect that's code for need to take more money out of your pocketbooks and wallets and give it to washington where they're happy to spend it. >> reporter: warren, forced on the defensive in a race she was favored to win, insists brown is more conservative than he is willing to admit. >> scott brown stands with the millionaires. me? i don't want to go to washington to stand up for the millionaires, the billionaires, the big oil. i want to go to washington to fight for jobs for working people. >> ifill: on a rainy sunday morning brown rallied supporters at a local pumpkin patch. among them sally russell who has voted for kennedy, president obama and brown. >> i work very hard on his first campaign. which surprised me. quite a bit. i thought he would do a good job. and the circumstances where senator kennedy had passed away. and i think he was... i'm not sure i was behind him as a person but as a senator i thought he was just outstanding. >> ifill: at town and country bowling lanes, diane travers, a democrat who supported brown two years ago said she's not so sure about him anymore >> i did vote for scott brown the last time because i felt very good vibes. i'm up and down. i have a feeling i'm going to go for elizabeth this time >> ifill: democrats outnumber republicans 3 to 1 in the deep blue bay state but republicans have won here statewide before including of course former governor romney but to win re-election scott brown is counting on the uncommitted voters that make up fully half of the electorate to be his fire wall. >> we need somebody who is going to be truly bipartisan >> ifill: brown describes himself at nearly every campaign stop as part of a vanishing breed of capitol hill moderates. warren as an unrepentant liberal >> why would you send another extreme person down there to be in lock step with that agenda and create more gridlock? you wouldn't do it. you shouldn't do it. >> ifill: warren portrays herself as the outsider washington needs. >> i talk to people before i was ever in the race. they said to me, now, elizabeth, they said, you've never been in politics before so you need to understand this. it's going to be mean. it's going to be the worst thing you've ever seen but we sure hope you'll do it. i do have to say i think we need a better sales pitch. >> ifill: pollsters have been taking the pulse of the state's voters >> the majority of independent voters in massachusetts really do want democrats to stay in control of the senate. i mean that's one of the real uphill battles that scott brown has been fighting. that's why you hear during the debates he'll say the word independent and bipartisan probably more than any other word. >> if you don't agree with my opponent, you know what she does? she attacks you >> ifill: we caught up with both campaigns this weekend >> i'm a republican from massachusetts so it's always an uphill battle to do it better, be more available, to be more accountable >> ifill: how much democratic support do you need to win? >> i don't know. we've had up to the, you know,... >> ifill: you don't know? 'm going to get a lot of democrats and a lot of independents and a lot of republicans >> ifill: what is it that you're saying to them that appeals? >> i don't have to say anything. i just have to show them my record of being the independent person that they sent down there, the guy that is not beholden to anybody >> ifill: there is concern that you're going to be a lock step democrat that you won't listen to the other side >> that's the wrong way to look at it. the financial punches that have come at america's working families have not respected party. they've hit people, whether the people were democrats, republicans, independents, libertarians, vegetarians. it didn't make any difference. they just keep getting punched. >> ifill: both candidates are counting on women voters in a commonwealth that has never elected a woman senator or governor. the air waves are clogged with a round of ads with one accusing the other of bad faith on women's issues >> i mean all you have to do is is look at his voting record >> he had one chance to confirm a supreme court justice to uphold "roe v. wade." he voted no >> i'm very disappointed one vote to protect birth control >> scott brown says he's for women but he's not >> i'm elizabeth warren and i approve this message >> scott brown is pro-choice. he supports women's health care. he's for good jobs with equal pay. scott will fight for our families. coming from a house full of women he wouldn't have it any other way. >> i'm scott brown and i approve this message. >> ifill: the vitriol has spilled over into their face-to-face debates >> one of the largest driving forces behind the high cost of education is administrative costs. as we know, professor warren makes about $350,000 to teach one course >> the women of massachusetts need a senator that can count on not some of the time but all of the time. >> ifill: massachusetts voters who tell pollsters they are unhappy with washington gridlock and are concerned about who will control the senate are paying attention. >> it really feels kind of fun to have massachusetts be a target in a national way because usually people just assume it's just a blue state. that's that >> well, i have it in the back of my mind that the last two years what scott brown has done has prepared himself for the election. so i'm a little nervous that he might be moving more toward the conservative side. i lean more toward the liberal side >> i don't think that ms. warren is concerned about the citizens of massachusetts. i think she just wants to be a democrat, you know, to recapture and reclaim the seat that was held by a democrat in the state for a lot of years. >> ifill: with less than two dozen days left until the election and one more debate to go, warren and brown are stepping on the gas. >> i'm going to be out there working my skinny little fanny off over the next 24 days making this happen and here's what i want to know. are you ready to work to make it happen? ( cheers and applause ) >> do me a favor. don't go to bed on november 6 and say, darn, i should have done more. >> ifill: that is the message they both approve. >> suarez: online we >> suarez: online, we've posted a slideshow of photographs from gwen's trip. >> woodruff: massachusetts is among the top senate contests our stewar stuart rothenberg ann page will be watching on election day. it's one of nine toss-up races on the ballot. those races are nevada, montana, indiana, wisconsin, virginia, connecticut and massachusetts. susan page is the washington bureau chief for usa today and stu rothenberg is also a columnist for roll call. thank you both for being with us. susan, republicans need to win four morrison at seats if president obama wins re-election to gain the majority. only three if governor romney wins. what are the prospects? >>
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Oct 26, 2012 7:00pm EDT
research. he's in los angeles tonight. charles, do these apple, microsoft releases represent a big change in direction for the industry. not just for microsoft but for other makers? >> absolutely. we have seen a real shift here in the competitive dynamic. it used to be about the pc. and now people are spending more and more time on these mobile devices whether they are tablets or smart phones. and that's really a place where microsoft is extremely weak compared to amazon, google and apple, especially. and so this represents a real shift for microsoft trying to be as relevant in this new computing world as they have been in the past. >> suarez: well, it's the largest single supplier of operating systems in the world. once a player like microsoft decides the future's in touch, does it move some of, have some of of its own momentum that the future's in touch, that's it? >> well, i think apple has already established that that is the case and others have followed. you know, i think microsoft is with the launch of windows 8 not just trying to reimagine the pc as we heard him say, but al
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Oct 22, 2012 7:00pm EDT
on it. many manage to bounce back. los angeles lakers' star kobe bryant was charged with sexual assault in 2003 after winning three nba championships. the charge was eventually dropped and he won two more titles. then atlanta falcons quarterback michael vic spent two years in prison for dog fighting. he joined the philadelphia eagles after he was released from prison in 2009. and tiger woods was engulfed in a sex scandal but returned to play and won his 74th tournament last summer. some thoughts now about the fallout of the lance armstrong story and those of other athletes whose reputations have been tarnished in this modern era. christine brennan is a sports writer and columnist for usa today and abc news. she's covered armstrong, marion jones, and the rise of performance-enhancing drugs in sports. as we noted, christine, this story is not the first. probably not the last. what's different about the armstrong saga? >> i think what's different is that lance armstrong has long ago left the sport sphere, the realm of sports and moved on to a much higher plane in terms of his role
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Oct 14, 2012 2:30pm EDT
obama had left hawaii and his grandparents behind. now he was on the mainland, in los angeles, at occidental college. they called it oxy. >> he was the most casual, unpretentious, nicest guy. i mean, my indelible image of him was always in a hawaiian shirt, and some op shorts and flip-flops. i don't know that he had a long pair of pants during college. >> narrator: he'd come to oxy with an attitude straight from hawaii-- "cool head, main thing"-- a laid-back sensibility that didn't wear well with everyone. >> for the first time there are african-americans there, not in enormous number, but enough that there is... there is the kids from compton, from philadelphia, from la, from seattle. >> he was a white black kid, you know. and that has meaning for us in the sense of he was black in skin color but he didn't necessarily identify with being, with his blackness with same way i did. >> they didn't think he was one of them. sort of a repetitive theme in his life after that. is he black enough? >> yes. there was some pushback from certain individuals that weren't, again, as open-minded
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Oct 24, 2012 6:00pm EDT
small businesses to major corporations. what can we do for you? presented by kcet, los angeles. presented by kcet, los angeles.
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Oct 25, 2012 6:00pm EDT
>> this is "bbc world news." funding for this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers use their expertise in global finance to guide you through the business strategies and opportunities of international commerce. we put our extended global network to work for a wide range of companies, from small businesses to major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news." >> this is bbc world news america reporting from washington. i'm kathy kaye. after months of bloodshed, the syrian government agrees to a temporary cease-fire. just days before there is still heavy fighting. can afghanistan really be a viable state? a gloomy picture and they suggested a change of course.. and why mixing styria's with satire could helping win the white house -- a serious with a satire could help win the white house. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. after months of conflict, will e sound of guns and mortar shells fall silent in syria on friday? the syrian military says it will adhere to a cease-fire for the muslim holiday. but a statement on television says that the army reserves the right to retaliate against rebel attacks. the fragile truce was negotiated by those who hope it could lead to a broader peace process. caroline hawley has the story. largest city today, the front line has shifted after weeks of stalemate. the rebels say they have made significant advances in aleppo, taking territory they have never held before. but can they keep it? and will these men now put down their guns? tonight, on state-run television, a statement from the military. it says it will observe a truce before the muslim holiday. the man who negotiated a truce the said at the start of the job that was nearly impossible. most rebel groups have seemed to agree to the cease-fire, but they do not fight under a single combined. at least one islamist group said it will not observe the true spirit -- the troops. >> of the world is watching on friday morning. we all understand there is a lack of trust between the parties, and therefore, we all understand that we cannot be sure yet what will transpire. hoe thpe is that we e nsguill fall silent. for lee peop of syria. >> it is -- this is syria's bord with turkey on the eve of the truce. since the conflict began, no cease-fire has taken hold. the expectations for this one are low. >> to the conflict in afghanistan now, where the u.s. military says two of its shoulders have been shot dead by a man wearing an afghan police uniform. it is the latest in a series of insider attacks against international troops. yesterday there was a an attack on two british soldiers cannot helmand program -- british soldiers in helmand province. now there are some who say a rival state may not be achievable. >> the unit of marines was on patrol in one of the toughest areas of homeland. two marines were hit by gunfire and fatally wounded. a one afghan policeman was also killed. the m.o. de said in a statement that the provision patrolman were not in working with any afghan partners of the time. we do not yet know what initiated the exchange of gunfire. the investigation is ongoing. >> the female british soldier has been -- has been named lance corporal channing day. she was just 25. she was proud to be an army medic and always wanted an army career. the corporal who died alongside her was david o'connor, age 27. he was called one of the best, brave, committed, and a true friend. the u.k. may have to recognize that creating a viable state in afghanistan is achievable and p's on the international development community has failed in working alongside the afghan government. >> a huge amount of life has been lost in afghanistan. gains have been made since the taliban were in charge. but we have to focus on securing those gains, rather than more ambitious objectives, for tebow, like building a viable state. -- for example, like building a viable state. >> in kabul, one afghan mps said it is a threatened culture. >> one of the biggest problems is that corruption is everywhere. >> the focus here now is very much on what the west can realistically achieve as international combat forces prepared to leave by the end of 2014. many lives have been lost. nobody wants those sacrifices to have been in vain. but it is increasingly clear that while the international community wants to continue to help, much of what happens next is up to the afghans themselves. >> and a quick look at some other news from around the world. 66 are now known to have been killed in an upsurge of ethnic violence between muslims and buddhists in burma. the more than half the fatalities were within, and more .don 2000 homes have been burnen e. the u.n. says large numbers of people are fleeing the violence and heading for already over the crowded camps. -- already over-crowded camps. one activist is accused of causing a riot. he is thought to have been snatched in kiev last week and taken back across the border. there are still some high levels of contamination, which had thought to have declined by now, more than any year after the japanese earthquake. the storm has battered at jamaica, haiti and cuba, killing at least two. >> hurricane sandy tore through the eastern part of cuba during the night, crossing the entire region while hardly the in the intensity, as usually happens when such storms cross overland. towns and villages were drenched in torrential rains. wins write a maximum sustained speed of 170 kilometers per hour -- not the wind was at a maximum sustained speed of 170 kilometers per hour. several residents were moved out of harm's way. others rode out the storm as best they could. >> we are handling it ok. >> but at this evacuation center, some who found themselves in the hurricane's path have needed treatment. as the hurricane moved off north to the bahamas compaq -- to the bahamas, daylight met them without power. before hurricane sandy had cuba, it had battered at jamaica. power lines were down and many were forced to be taken to emergency shelters. an elderly man was said to have been killed when a boulder crashed into his house. ibegs a there are many that are trapped in the keys. they were told to evacuate before and refuse to do so. they are now trapped. they called for help, which was by that time to late. >> while jamaica begins couldn't -- cleaning up and council cost -- and counts the costs, the hurricane is headed for the bahamas and there is a tropical storm warning for florida. >> election day in america is not for another 12 days, but that has not stopped millions across the country from already casting their votes. in the past half-hour, there was one notable figure at about the box, barack obama. he is the first one ever to get there before polling day. here is why. >> i travel a lot in my work and i'm not sure if i will be in dc on election day. why not get it 0 @ -- get it out of the way now? >> one of the 1 million americans were casting their ballots early. what is driving his vote? >> a fundamental change in the direction of our government .repare needless to say, i voted for mitt romney for president. i feel he has the experience and the solutions that are likely to put our country on a more successful track. >> also dropping in, patrice weddie, who runs a small business. she is sticking with barack obama because of his health care reform prepared -- reform. >> a couple of days after the reforms kick in, i got a notice that my monthly premium would go down $10. i have all the proof i need to know that the current president and administration are doing a great job. >> at least 35% are expected to go to the polls before election day, up from 30% four years ago. in ohio, close to half the votes will be cast early. in florida, two thirds. in colorado, a projected 85% will be cast before november 6. the most famous early bird of all cast his ballot in chicago. the first sitting president to vote early in person. >> i just want everybody to see how incredibly efficient this was. >> from bill to burris, democrats have lined up their biggest stars to encourage early voting. >> of voting matters. elections matter. >> they are offering transport to polling stations, allowing the campaign to lock in the vote of young people in particular, who otherwise may not turn out. >> everybody who votes, they know that. that is the information that the election officials share with the campaign. they know if someone has voted early. they scratch that person off the list and go down to the next person. >> republicans are better organized than four years ago, but still find themselves at outmuscled on the early vote. does it matter? traditional republicans are more reliable in turning out on polling day. >> in a country where just about everything else is reliant on convenience compaq civic duty is as well. >> for more on why early voting has become so important in this presidential race, i am joined by adam sorensen, the associate editor of "time" magazine. why are more americans voting early and does it affect the outcome of the race? gregg's it absolutely does. -- >> it absolutely does. and have campaigns trying to turn more out. especially democrats. if you look at ohio, you have 1 million that have already voted there. the margin of victory between barack obama and john mccain in 2008 was only 200,000 votes. and that was a fairly large margin, 2, historically. >> and early voting across the nation does tend to lean democratic? >> it does. you can capitalize on these voters the do not necessarily vote in every election and it also appeals to minority groups. >> i was down in ohio last week and i spoke to the romney dara and they said they were not worried about early voting because republicans are more traditional by nature. they like the ceremony of going and voting. >> what republicans will also tell you is that they feel democrats are using out some of their vote early. once you go in on election day, republicans will have more success turning out their voters. that is a little bit of spin, and it is hard to say. but just because, for instance, obama was leading earlier on, that does not necessarily mean he will hunt win in ohio by the same margins. >> on the campaign trail, the president is talking about getting people out on the early voting. but he is also trying to sway any undecided voters. are there any left in the country? greta i think there are. -- >> i think there are. we have seen the number of undecided voters shrink closer to the election, but also at this time of the election, there are fewer and fewer undecided voters. but there are a few people who do not really pay attention to politics who tune in late. they are persuade a ball up to the last minute. >> after two years -- they're able to be persuaded of to the last minute. >> after two years and lots of coverage, it is amazing that people have not made up their minds. gregg's is amazing, but there are those out there. -- >> it is amazing, but there are those out there. >> thank you. still to come, why the world of magic is in russian politics. a disappearing act by dmitri metgod of. -- dmitri medvedev. it is being billed by -- been billed as a massive computer giant. the question everybody is asking is how it will fare against apple's ipad. our correspondent had a look and he reports back. >> this is what computing house looked like for decades, the age of the windows pc. but now we move into a different era of touchscreen mobile computing and microsoft needs to catch an accurate -- catch up. if sheer enthusiasm for his company counts, steve ballmer can make that happen. >> i love this company. yeah! >> he has three imagined windows in windows 8. >> and more than a decade after that, microsoft's boss is still excited. this time, about windows 8. he has decided to bring his company, rather late, into the touch screen age. >> it is an epic of thing for microsoft. it is up there with the top two or three big moment, including windows '95 and the launch of the ibm pc. it starts us on this new era of computing. >> but microsoft has been slow to turn ideas into successful products. bill gates was showing off tablet computers a decade ago, but it was the apple ipad that made money from that idea. but this, the microsoft surfaced in tablet power by windows is designed to show the company moving forward in a mobile world. at the new york launched tonight, steve ballmer was speaking again about windows 8. if consumers do not share his excitement, there could be trouble for him and his company. >> it is barely six months since dmitry medvedev left the kremlin as president to become russia's prime minister. in the short time frame he has seen his power and influence significantly reduced. president putin has been reversing many of the policies and reforms that mr. medvedev instituted. it has suggested that he is gradually disappearing from russia's political stage. here's a report. >> the world of magic is strangely similar to the world of russian politics. behind the kremlin walls, it is all smoke and mirrors. to succeed, you need a cool head, sleight of hand, and there is something else you've got to be good at. making people disappear. and it vladimir putin is the consummate conjurer. since becoming president again, he has begun to wave away the memory of dmitri medvedev's presidency. he has made many of his predecessors reforms and disappear. there are plenty of examples prepare. medvedev had decriminalized slander. putin has read criminalize it. even medvedev's decision to scrap wintertime and keep russian clocks an hour ahead is all under review. it makes him look weak. >> he was and he's gone. putin with light -- prudent would like things to be written in marble. no one but him. >> he has not been able to get rid of him completely. he is still precious prime minister and head of the ruling party. he with a proven's actions, is seen as weaker. his decision not to run for president again men -- made many russian liberals feel betrayed. they were counting on him to lead them into something more democratic. was that a mistake? >> no magician has been able to wave a wand and now we shall have democracy. you cannot just change the way people think. >> and perhaps mr. medvedev's change of fortune is not so surprising. after all, if you take part in the spells and sorcery, there is always the risk that you will never be quite the same again. >> the magical disappearing act with mr. medvedev and his reform. humor has become an integral part in the presidential race in the u.s. we have seen barack obama and mitt romney both on late-night part -- a late night talk shows, while canadians have been -- comedians have been mocking them both. how does humor affect the presidential race? there is a new book about the politics of humor in the presidential race. >> when politics become so polarized in and we start barking at each other a lot, there's a lot of humor in there. >> i feel really restive after the night -- a nice, long naps after the first debate. >> it is nice to wear what ann and i wear around the house. >> i am not sure if there is a bias. the form of satire is such that is anti-establishment, and that is firmly in the liberal we house. it is not in the conservative toolbox. >> michael vick moore in speedos. rush limbaugh in speedos. anybody in speedos. >> if you try to be a conservative who is then funny, it may not be as funny as if he got out there and just try to be funny. >> some of in a single word the best argument for his candidacy. gun at -- governor bush? >> strategery. >> it has to hang on something everyone understands. which means, and george bush is not articulate. al gore stammers. barack obama is cold. that kind of thing. >> i don't mean citizens and i don't mean members of our armed citizens and i don't mean southern whites. >> but, he has to do is reinforce the existing idea of who you are out there. >> the hotel california, you can check in, but you can never -- >> trust the staff with your valuables. >> that is true anywhere. >> but especially california, and j.k., north mexico. -- a.k.a., north mexico. >> is more about his turn, professorial facade. >> with me always is my and burk translator. after the recent town hall debate and the town halt -- the town hall debate -- >> i've got my sweater back. >> when you do make a joke, it has the risk of offending a lot of people. on the iran, most canadians do not care if they have offended you, and that is -- on the other hand, most comedians and do not care if they have offended you. that is where, it gives them strength. >> that is it for our newshour. thanks so much for watching. >> make sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> funding for this presentation was made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers use their expertise in global finance to guide you through the business strategies and opportunities of international commerce. we put our extended global network to work for a wide range of companies, from small businesses to major corporations. what can we do for you? >> "bbc world news" was presented by kcet, los angeles. presented by kcet, los angeles.
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Oct 25, 2012 12:00am EDT
tavis: good evening. from los angeles, i am tavis smiley. tonight, a look at the issue of health care in american urban environments as told in of this year's most acclaimed documentaries, "the waiting room." peter nicks decided to chronicle the daily workings of an oakland emergency room, creating a stark picture of what 24 hours is like in an inner-city pr -- e.r. we are glad you have joined us. a conversation with peter nicks coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have a lot of work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: the issue of health care has been a constant conversation in this country over the past few years, amplified during this campaign season. behind the politics of health care is the reality of what many americans face, especially in inner cities. peter nicks decided to chronicle a day in a life of an open emergency room. the film is called "the waiting room" and is being called one of the best documentary projects of the year. it is playing in select cities across the country. here are some scenes from the "the waiting room." you have to wait for that -- >> you have to wait for the same day as an emergency services. no limits. >> the emergency department is completely full. the beds are full. nobody moves. >> i cannot look through the cracks. >> call up here and ask him. >> i was just laid off my job in march. >> heart rate is really high. >> i have never had anything happen to me since my in vincible 20s. >> is ok. i will not go until you are ready. >> mail from a gunshot wound -- male, gunshot wou. >> this numbness sends a wri- down. >> if you are diagnosed with a stroke, you are set right out the door. >> we are an institution of last resort. >> stay with me. you want to see the doctor today? >> we are putting seven in three, three in the hallway. >> this is my first time in the hospital. >> congratulations. always a first. >> thank god for them. they should be back together. >> sit with me. >> i heard what>> you heard h>> you heard what happened? tavis: why would a hospital, public or private, let you in with cameras to see any or all of this? why would they let you and? >> they took a huge risk in letting a documentary crew into this hospital. i will give a lot of credit to roy lester -- lassiter,ou who understood that that transparency was important, not just that his institution, but around the country as we are trying to figure out what is going on in our health care systems as it relates to our community and how can we fix that? he sensed the story that i want to try to tell. we were able to build a trust and he understood that i was more interested in telling the story of the community's struggle and the institutions struggle than i was in doing an ex's on the hospital, per se. tavis: tell me what you think he wanted you to see, wanted the viewer to see through your work about this particular hospital. >> the story that people are familiar with at highland, not just in oakland but communities around the country, baltimore, the bronx, boston, news at 11:00, when somebody comes in shot. that is the dominant possession -- perception that the community has about our public hospitals. in the debate -- in the beginning, we communicated that we want to tell a deeper story and go beyond the headlines and beyond the statistics, particularly as it relates to the uninsured and the community that represents the uninsured. that was the starting point of that trust that building. tavis: what do you want? what did you have in mind? what did you want the viewer to see about what these hospitals in the inner cities are up against every day? >> the antenna first went up for me, my wife and i first came out of graduate school, the same grad with school at uc berkeley. i came out with journalism and she came out with speech. she would come home with stories of her patients that were quite remarkable and surprising to me. one of them i remember. there was this guy and he was a drummer in this village in east africa and he was a legend, like bob marley. he was in the hospital and people came, they brought food, brought their drums, they would break out into song. this guy was just a statistic, just a headline, somebody that no one would ever get to know. that got me thinking about how many more people there were like this guy, whose stories were never told. outside the context of the health-care debate, i was interested in the stories of the community and what they were going through day-to-day. that began the exploration and development of the idea that eventually became the film. tavis: i was fascinated when i got a chance to look at it. you basically follow for five different patients throughout the 24-hour period. it is a day in the life of this hospital. you follow these patients as they come in and what their experience and journey is like. how did you develop a relationship with these patients for them to let you tell the story of their experience? >> the film was preceded by this digital storytelling project. i workshop via biya baran institute in san francisco, a workshop that takes documentary's and three envisions them as a trans- medium digital projects. the notion was, at this moment in time, the health care debate was getting so noisy. the people on the front lines, their voices were not really being represented in that conversation. i was getting e-mails from whoever sang, share your story, tell your health care story, of lodi video. -- upload a video. i suspected that people were not doing that. we wanted to sit down and talk with people and meet with people. our question was, what are you waiting for? that led to profound and poignant moments of expression. the question was not, what do you think about health care reform, what do you think about this hospital, people just wanted to share who they were. they won the dignity in that moment. when you walk into a public hospital waiting room, if you lose your dignity. we wanted to capture that. that really set the tone for the film, this notion that, let's allow this community a voice and tried to step back ourselves and not editorialize and just allow the lives of these people to come forward. tavis: health is as personal and issue as there is. health is personal, our religion, our faith is a personal issue. people do not open up easily about those issues. they want to know what the process was. that is why i asked that. you made a statement that is worthy of going back to. this notion that people lose their dignity when i walk into a public hospital waiting room. most americans have never sat in a public waiting room at a hospital. what do you mean when you say that walking in there oftentimes cost one his or her dignity? >> i remember the first time i went to thailand. we were rebranded at the -- to highland. we work rebranded -- we were rearended at the 580. i remember thinking, i am going to be here for a while. there are more pressing issues than me. you are being forgotten. nobody is focusing on you. it is not that the people do not care. the system does not have the resources to handle the volume of people. when you walk into a public hospital waiting room, sometimes for low acuity primary care health care, you are dealing with people coming in the back door who are shot, in car accidents, have had strokes or heart attacks. it is that dual resource problem of an emergency room trying to provide primary care to an entire community and deal with emergencies that results in a really long wait times and the sense that you are a statistic or number. take a number. that is dis-empowering for people. people feel helpless. in that moment. in the macro, there is the sense that this system is not working for me, there is the apathy. there is the sense that nobody cares about me. we got to understand that in terms of talking to people and saying, would you like to share your story? people would ask why we're doing it. we would say, if you share your story, somebody in washington could hear you. sometimes, people say, nobody in washington cares about me. that sense of apathy and frustration really came through with what we want -- with what we want to try to do. we wanted to allow people know that we were listening and to connect their story to the outside world. tavis: mr. obama wants to return to all -- to washington, specifically to the oval office. mr. romney wants to deny him. there has been a great debate about obama care. the president says he now likes the name obamacare, so i will call it obamacare. there was a great debate. there was a suggestion that we do not need obamacare. he went on to suggest that if something happens to you and they rush to to the hospital, they are not going to turn you away. they are going to be there for you. for those who actually see public hospitals or our system in that way, that is, something tragic and traumatic happens to you, the hospital will not turn you away, what do you say to mitt romney or people who view that system in that way? >> when we started developing the approach to the film, ultimately, the storytelling project set that tone. it was going to be and a political film and we were not and have -- we were not going to have that narration or text. that decision turned out to be a powerful decision. what we decided to do was train the lens on the waiting room, follow people during their day- to-day, navigating without access to the health care that the rest of the country had. give a real sense of what that feels like, what it sounds like, what it looks like. when romney came on 60 minutes, i was looking for is number. you know, i actually made a film about what that looks like. not saying one way or the other, getting political about it, but at this moment in time, we need to understand what that really means. it was a bit serendipitous. as an independent filmmaker, it is a big task to try to distribute your film and get it out there. we are trying to do that. nobody from the romney or obama campaign called the because i do not think people know about the film. the blinders are on and their focus on getting reelected. this film represents zooming out. behind these contentious debates and arguments, there are actual people and this is what they're going through. tavis: i am glad you mentioned this. i said one of these debates, it was 60 minutes. i am glad you said that for the record. to your point now, that the obama people had not contacted you and you were trying to put faces to what this debate has been about with regards to health care in this country, why is it that you think a film can make a difference? michael moore is a friend of mine. we all know his project, "sicko." a number of projects where people have tried to invent the conversation about the health care debate in this country. what makes you think your project can make a difference in the debate, particularly given that your hospital is a public hospital that is so often there for people of color who live in these communities? i was glad that you saw a bunch of white patients. it was not just black people. when you think of public hospital, you think color-coded. why do you think a project like this, in this contentious debate, matters? >> there were a couple of things i was trying to do with the film. in some ways, it was not just a film about health care but about the community and revealing it in three dimensions. when you walk into the waiting room, it is a remarkable stage, a turnstile of humanity. in my mind, it broke all kinds of stereotypes that i had, not just the patients, but people providing remarkable care without enough resources. i really believe that a story intimately told without comment can be a very partial agent for change. it can be a very powerful political statement in and of itself, particularly in the health-care debate, where these voices of people are not being represented. polemic films that shake the trees are vital in our country, too, and serve a purpose. that film had been made and would be made. the style, the film making in terms of letting you in, in a way, replicating that experience of sitting down next to a hospital waiting room and over hearing their stories, is important because it is a step towards building empathy, which, to some degree, we have an empathy crisis in this country where we divide each other ideology -- ideologically and wheat pit ourselves against one another. it was really important to remind people that we are all in this together. uninsured or not, you can lose your job tomorrow. that woman in film lost her job. that was definitely something that we were trying to accomplish. tavis: the think this could actually matter? >> i like to call myself an idealist. of course i believe they matter. that is why i committed the last several years of my life trying to get this film not just made it but distributed and heard. i think we are distracted. we are so distracted by the minutia of the battles that we forget about the soldiers. these people are the soldiers, not just the patients, but the caregivers on the front lines. the premise of my film, to some degree, is that the system is broken. the system may be broken, but the people are not. there are people at the heart of this thing that we all know that our us, whether it is ourselves, our neighbors, our kids bus driver, what have you. in that waiting room, you are going to see somebody you love or yourself. communicating that in an intimate way can create change because it can create the motion, connection, that framework. it can refrain the discussion around health care reform that has become so divisive and ideological. tavis: this project allows us to see the content of what happens or does not happen. we see the content of what happens in these public hospitals. the broader context of what these public hospitals are up against is a budget cuts, and here in los angeles, every night. a great debate some years back about whether or not it would come through, come back on line or stay online. in chicago, they have had the debate -- your project is about a particular hospital in oakland. across the country, in inner cities, these hospitals are up against the wall. the budget cuts and political decisions are closing some of these hospitals. others are on the brink of being closed. i say that as background ask this question -- what happens with all of the drama and difficulty of what happens inside highland every day? what happens if these waiting rooms no longer exist? what happens if they are not there? whatappens if they disappear? >> you have seen a little bit of this with how the -- how society has dealt with the mentally ill. closing down a lot of facilities. they are out on the streets. they are going to show up on your doorstep. that is the thing that is always fascinated me with how some people approach this idea. well, people who are going into these public hospitals are wasting taxpayer dollars. if we did not care for them, where would they go? the vulnerability to illness, we are all vulnerable. we are all human. we all share that in common. this notion that you can brush aside that reality seems like something that you cannot do. i was just in houston and they have the san jose clinic, run by the catholic church, they provide free health care for the uninsured. those would have to pop up. you cannot just create those overnight. entire states, texas and florida, are talking about shutting down the system. something has got to rise up. i am not an expert in that world, but it would be certainly a crisis given what it already looks like in our public hospitals today with the volumes they are dealing with, the complexity of providing continuity of care to communities, the juggling between primary-care and emergencies that you see unfolding every day in the waiting room. they are already at capacity. i cannot imagine how that would be a good thing. tavis: as i see this footage, let me circle back and close by talking about the care givers. how do these caregivers, knowing what they are up against every day, knowing that the dignity and the humanity of these patients are challenged, contested every day, how do these caregivers sustain themselves? >> this is a really remarkable place. a lot of the staff, nurses assistants, lvn's, support staff is from that community. they were born in highland and have a deep connection to the community. that is family. you care for your family. the residents who come from some of the best medical schools in the country, because you get the best training at a place like high lead, -- like highland, they come from harvard, yale, stanford, they grow from the training and you see it. dr. white, you saw him in the film, you saw him grow as a human being and doctor. it was a profound transformation. they believe in what they're doing and believe in providing the care for those communities. they know that the people have nowhere else to go. it is hard. it is like a sport. you imagine getting hit. these linebackers and quarterbacks are getting hit. these doctors and nurses are getting hit emotionally every day with the weight of the entire community, whether it is a young child being killed, a family has to be informed, seeing someone repeatedly coming back, the frequent-flier is, drug addicts coming back over and over again, but not giving up because you do not know where that person has been the day before. you do not know where that person is going to be the day after. if you can give them one more shot. they believe that, they internalize that. the institution, the community engenders that sense of purpose. it is quite remarkable. it was surprising to me as i got to know a lot of the caregivers. tavis: the project is called "the waiting room." i suspect that as awards season gets closer, you will start hearing that name. great that you on the program. congratulations. that is our program for tonight. i will see you back here next, on pbs. until next time, thanks for watching and keep the faith. >> the third one is the one i am most concerned about. we will probably have to go to the o.r. first. >> blood pressure. >> good. >> when we get the ring down from the paramedics, 12-15 peo
WETA
Oct 4, 2012 6:30pm EDT
>> this is nbr. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> tom: i'm tom hudson. president obama and mitt romney are back on the campaign trail, but still debating taxes. >> susie: i'm susie gharib. the feds launch one of the largest crackdowns on medicare fraud. $430 million in scams leads to arrests from coast to coast. >> tom: and we'll introduce you to a company hoping to become the mcdonald's for healthy eaters. >> susie: that and more tonight on nbr! >> tom: it was right back to the campaign trail today for president obama and mitt romney. the president went on the attack after what's been perceived as a lackluster debate performance. and the president accused governor romney of not telling americans the truth about what president obama calls romney's $5 trillion tax plan. darren gersh, tonight, looks at what the real impact of the romney tax plan could be on the american economy. >> reporter: here's where the president gets that $5 trillion number he used again today. governor romney's plan to cut tax rates by 20% would add up to about $5 trillion over ten years, assuming no other changes. but governor romney is planning to make other changes by eliminating tax deductions worth about the same amount. but the president is accurate when he says governor romney is making many promises in his tax plan. romney says upper-income people will not get a net tax cut; middle-income people will not see their taxes go up; incentives for savings and investment won't be touched; the estate tax and alternative minimum tax will be eliminated-- all this while cutting tax rates and not changing the amount of money the federal government brings in. an analysis by the tax policy center shows governor romney will have to make some big tradeoffs. >> so, governor romney has made five promises. he can't keep them all. he is going to have to, at some point, abandon one of those promises. he cannot cut tax rates, cut taxes on the middle class, cut taxes on capital gains, and balance the budget all at once. >> reporter: romney advisers have said they would consider eliminating tax breaks on at least two forms of saving, life insurance and muni bonds. and the governor's supporters argue tax cuts generate enough growth to offset some of their cost. >> people can have reasonable disagreements about the magnitude of that growth effect, but to assume that it is zero, i think, is wrong. and once you relax that assumption, then, all of a sudden, other things start to be possible. >> reporter: but it's hard to be sure about the impact of tax cuts on the economy, which is why the experts in congress and the treasury who are responsible for estimating the cost of tax changes generally ignore the impact of tax reforms on the entire economy. darren gersh, nbr, washington. >> susie: here on wall street, traders and investors were taking a fresh look at stock sectors today, assessing what a romney or obama win would mean for the markets. also a lot of talk about minutes from the latest federal reserve meeting, and word that policymakers are considering numerical targets for unemployment as a guide for fed policy action. by the closing bell, the dow added about 81 points, the nasdaq rose 14, and a ten point gain on the s&p. joining us now to talk about all this, art hogan, managing director and strategist at lazard capital markets. you know on the floor a lot of the traders were calling this a romney raleigh. others say there were other factors, what were the message of the markets today? >> well, i tell you this, i think romney had a big part in this. the other piece was that the-- they came out and pretty positive commentary about what they are going to do about their monetary policy but if you look at how sectors mover today we saw a romney affect as you look at health care sectors and the hospitals in particular. >> susie: exactly there were some stock sectors that responded to what the candidate said in the debate last night. you talk about health-care stocks. let's take a look. there was a lot of criticism by romney of the obama health-care program, so we saw hospital stocks like tenet and ata fall by 2%, humana up there, and looking atealth insurers like billionpoint also responding on the upside so what were you telling your clients today what to do with the health care stocks? >> well, one of the things we've been tracking as the corelation between health-care stocks in general and the possibility of obama winning a re-election versus romney, the challenger coming in and wing. and what happens is there is a divergence. health care in general tends to do okay if people think romney is going to be re-elected and that is overall. but health care really breaks down to the service providers like the hospitals. which would actually severely benefit quite a bit if obama care continued on as planned. but if we had someone like romney come and take over and you know do what he says to get rid of obama care the folks who provide service are certainly going to be adversely affected. the folks that provide insurance are going to be positively affected. we saw that effect today. it was very marked. >> susie: let's look at another sector because romney was talking a lot about how much he lkeats coal, both candidates mr. talkin about energy independence and you look at how coallk stocks did today, big gains there like arch coal, like alpha natural resources, is this a good place to put your money? >> well, i tell you this. it's early to be making bets on any sector and predicated against a presidential election. it is too close to call and certainly not the way you want to invest but i will tell you as we get closer and you feel more confident in the results of an election, i will tell you energy stocks in general, coal stocks in particular are certainly going to be a good investment. we'll unleash the power of the energy complex of the united states, become energy independence. there will be a lot of winners in the energy complex f there is a change in administration. >> real quickly, jobs was another big topic last night. we have the jobs report coming out tomorrow. it is expected the unemployment rate is going to go a little bit over 8%. what impact will that have on our markets tomorrow and on the election? >> it's amazing this is probably one of the last ones we get to focus on before election. there will be one more before november 2 but as we look at tomorrow's jobs reports it could go either way it is hard for this no to-- number to disappoint the market because we already have monetary policies, i think an upside number would be better for the president, the downside better for the challenger. so we will keep a close eye on that. >> susie: all right that number comes out at 8:30 eastern time tomorrow morning. we'll see what happens. art hoggan, managing director and strategist at lazard capital managements >> reporter: i'm erika miller in new york. there are 12.5 million people in america who are out of work, but still ahead, i'll introduce you to two new york city firms that can't hire workers fast enough. >> tom: the federal government made what it called one of the largest medicare fraud crackdowns today, arresting dozens of people across seven cities, accusing them of cheating medicare out of $430 million. today's busts involved 91 people, including doctors, nurses, and hospital administrators, including these arrests in miami. among the scams-- the president of riverside general hospital in houston and his son are accused of giving medicare patients food and cigarettes for claiming to get hospital care, but instead watched tv or played games. federal prosecutors said that scheme led to $158 million in fake bills. today's action, announced by the justice department, stretched from brooklyn to los angeles. >> this is something i think we see at a variety of levels. we see it among people who are health care professionals who take oaths to provide care and do no harm, and in fact they are doing great harm. we are going after people, whatever their positions, whatever their levels, to make sure we hold them accountable. >> gary can trell is the deputy inspector general for investigation at health and human services with us from our washington, d.c. bureau. how sophisticated were these schemes that the government alleged today? >> today's schemes involved the gamut from straight up fraud to very sophisticated schemes involving sometimes the provision of services that are simply masked as legitimate services. and sometimes billed at rates that are higher than the services that were delivered. and in many cases not necessary services. so that the schemes run the gamut across the country this time. >> 430 million dollars in all, what hopes are there to recover any of that money? >> well, we certainly are taking steps to recover that money. in many cases we issued payment suspensions, for example to stop any additional money from going out the door. in some situations we've actually frozen assets in order to await a judicial action to seize and forfeit those funds. so we are hopeful we will get much of that money back. >> one case involves five people, 67 million in phony mental health services. there's 100 million accusation of fake home health-care services. one doctor accused of signing 33,000 prescriptions for 2,000 patients. how come the accused fraud gets to those big numbers before it gets to the point that we saw today. >> what you see in those types of schemes are providers who are massacre aiding as legitimate provider, in some cases as i said providing some level of service but the necessity of those services are sometimes nonexistent. and so they are billing for services that do not need to be provided. and some cases they're not providing those services but these scheme conditions hard to detect. we've actually become more and more reliant upon data analytics to identify schemes such as these and unravel these more complicated fraud schemes using data. >> this is a big data. we talk about big data a lot when it comes to the for profit area but governments using it here. what you can point to as safeguards that have been put into place to protect and prevent fraud like this? >> well, we are certainly using big data to identify fraud as early in the process as possible. we're moving away from the old model of pay and chase, towards a model of prevention and detection and progress so we're stopping these schemes earlier on. and we're also, you know, the centers for medicare and medicaid services are taking steps to remove bad providers from the program and stop them from getting in the program before they start billing the medicare program. >> hundreds of billions of dollars at stake every year. hundreds of million accused today in the fraud bust. wee'vote gary cantrell with us, deputy >> susie: american consumers took a breather from shopping in september. the nation's retailers reported modest sales gains after back- to-school shopping wound down. the gap and t.j. maxx were the big winners; sales jumped 6%. macy's and target also posted solid gains, up 2% or more, but below analyst estimates. target also said it will stop reporting monthly sales numbers next year. the big disappointment-- kohl's, reporting a 2.7% decline, way below wall street estimates. gold prices sparkled to an 11- month high today as investors can't seem to get enough of the yellow metal. word that europe's central bank opted today to keep interest rates super-low helped push gold higher. december gold futures tacked on more than $16 an ounce to close at $1,796.50. 1,800 bucks an ounce is a key psychological resistance point for the precious metal. suzanne pratt takes a look at whether gold will cross through it. >> reporter: guess what's on the move again? you got it-- gold. gold futures are closing in on $1,800 an ounce, a gain of 14% this year alone and close to gold's all-time high of 1924. traders at the new york mercantile exchange credit fed chairman ben bernanke and his renewed push to keep u.s. interest rates ultra low for the run-up in gold. >> the fact that they're going to flood with more, more money is a very good sign for gold, and that's kind of what's propelled us to here. >> reporter: as for where prices are headed next? if the u.s. economic environment remains relatively slow, traders predict new highs for the precious metal could come in the first half of next year. that's if gold is able to break through certain technical levels. >> i think if we can get above $1,816. we should see 19 and a quarter. if we can get above $1,925, then $2,000 is definitely in our sights. >> reporter: experts say one thing that could push gold prices above $2,000 an ounce this year is if president obama is re-elected. the thinking-- the president will keep bernanke employed, which means interest rates stay very, very low. suzanne pratt, nbr, new york. >> tom: stocks moved higher ahead of tomorrow's report on the september job market. the s&p 500 really gained momentum just after 10:00 a.m. eastern time after the commerce department released its report on september factory orders. while total orders were down, it wasn't as bad as feared. the index finished higher by seven tenths of a percent. trading volume held steady on the big board-- 672 million shares. it was just under 1.6 billion on e nasdaq. financials and materials were two strongest stock sectors, up 1.5% and 1.3%, respectively. the energy sector recovered some of what it had lost earlier this week, rebounding 1%. bank of america and j.p. morgan were among those financial stocks fueling the gains and jesong move the d industrial average to its best gain in three weeks. bank of america gained 3.3% on heavy volume. this is b-of-a's highest price since mid-september. j.p. morgan rallied 2.4% to its highest close since early may. j.p. morgan is due to report third-quarter earnings a week from tomorrow. the third quarter earnings season unofficially begins on tuesday when alcoa reports its results. and there were buyers today ahead of that news. it was one of the biggest percentage gainers of the dow, moving up 3.3%. the stock shrugged off an analyst at j.p. morgan cutting earnings estimates for alcoa. the analyst pointed to weaker aluminum prices during the quarter. meantime, steel maker u.s. steel saw a small rebound in its share price, up 4.4%. but it's been a tough year for shareholders as the steel business has been hit by price cuts and weaker demand. u.s. steel is down 25% this year. global cement mixer cemex did something it hasn't done since early 2009-- it is talking publicly about its financiales future, expecting sales to show a small increase in e third quarter. as a building supply company, cemex was hit hard during the credit crunch. but shares have been rallying, hitting a 52-week high with today's 4.8% rally. the financial forecast came thanks to cemex selling bonds, marking its return to the corporate debt market. the tech sector was among the weakest areas of the market. software maker informatica ie feeling the slowdown in europe, warning earnings and revenues will be less than expected when it reports its quarterly results. the warning rattled investors, slashing 22.6% from its stock, falling to a new 52-week low. volume was more than ten times normal. medical technology firm nuvasive also warned its third quarter revenue will be disappointing. the stock fell 32.9%. nuvasive makesla ints and devices for spinal surgeries. it said it lost customers to competitors. mimicking what we saw in thean broader market, the financial sector e.t.f. saw the biggest gains among the five most actively traded exchange traded products. it was up 1.5%. four of the five most actively traded products were stronger. and that's tonight's "maet >> susie: all this week, we have been highlighting the need for job retraining. today, we look at a slightly different problem facing many high-tech start-ups. in spite of the weak economy, there are many firms that cannot fill positions. erika miller went to one soho building where firms gripe they can't hire as fast as they want. >> i've been working here for 221 hours. >> reporter: keith blanchard is one of the newest hires at thrillist, a media company targeting young, hip, urban men. three million subscribers get a daily email with recommended places to eat, drink, and have fun. >> i'm here because this is just a fantastic place, full of smart people, really motivated and just moving the needle on what the future can be. >> reporter: the soho-based firm was co-founded seven years ago by ben lerer. the firm nearly doubled in size this year to 215 employees and counting. there are openings for engineers, social media gurus, merchandisers, salespeople.. videographers, and more. so why, in this weak job market, are there so many open positions? >> there are plenty of people with the right experience, but we have a very specific sort of work hard/play hard culture here that is really right for some people and really not for others. >> reporter: it's not just thrillist that's eager to hire. in this one office building alone, there are half a dozen other tech start-ups in the same situation. zocdoc is a free online service that allows patients to find doctors who accept their insurance and book appointments instantly. they can even fill out medical forms electronically before their visit. in five years, zocdoc has grown to over 300 people. founder and c.e.o. cyrus massoumi wishes there were more. >> the one limiting factor to people.g re great people. so, it's incredibly hard. i spend nearly half my time recruiting. >> reporter: to woo potential hires, zocdoc offers free healthcare for employees and their family, catered lunch every day, flex time, and unlimited vacation. those perks were only part of what attracted new hire blair baumwell. >> i was looking at the web site, i was actually booking an appointment of my own, and saw that they were hiring. so, i thought, "hey, why don't i look at it? because i worked in the healthcare industry, i'm really passionate about it." >> reporter: unfortunately for these firms, the search for software engineers and other high skilled workers is not likely to get easier. >> for many years, we haven't been graduating enough of these people. and it's a sad story that we haven't adjusted, or we don't create an educational system that really signals to students and provides them incentives and information that this is where the jobs are. >> reporter: but thrillist and zocdoc aren't giving up, doing all they can to attract workers and make them feel at home. erika miller, nbr, new york. >> tom: tomorrow on nbr, we'll continue our job retraining coverage with a look at goodwill industries. it's the nation's largest non- profit dedicated to training workers and finding them jobs. and speaking of jobs, tomorrow, the government's monthly jobs report is out-- what it could mean for investors and the presidential election. >> susie: healthy food may soon be co
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Oct 19, 2012 12:30am EDT
multimediafo ns and information services worldwide. be more, pbs. tavis: good evening. from los angeles, i am tavis smiley. tonight, a conversation with d.l. hughley. he has a new comedy special. it is called "d.l. hughley: the endangered list." the special tax on many issues of our time, including the notes on a -- the notion of a post- racial america. we are glad you could join us for my conversation with d.l. hughley, coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have a lot of work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: please welcome d.l. hughley back to this program. later this month, you can catch his all new comedy special, called "d.l. hughley: the endangered list." the one-hour special airs saturday, october 27 on -- a
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Oct 22, 2012 6:00pm EDT
you? >> "bbc world news" was presented by kcet los angeles.
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Oct 17, 2012 12:00am EDT
tavis: good evening. from los angeles, i am tavis smiley. tonight marked the final time both candidates can address their issues, as the third and final debate next week deals solely with policy. there has been little mentioned about them many americans who now find themselves near the poverty level. how can it be that a country with such a noble history of social justice failed to do this? tonight, peter dreier. from -- peter dreier, from occidental college. his latest book is called 2: "the 100 greatest americans of the 20th century." we are glad to have you with our conversation with peter dreier, coming up. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to woe og w tr,rk as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: peter dreier is a professor of politics and chair of a department at occidental college and author of a new text called "the 100 greatest americans of the 20th century: a social justice hall of fame." peter dreier, good to have you on this program. >> it is good to be here, tavis. tavis: as i said at the top, there is still not a lot of talk about the least among us. there is a lot of talk about poverty. with a country that has such a social justice history, how is it that this seems to be missing in this campaign? >> i think that the history of this country, particularly the 20th century, it shows that when there are grass-roots protests and people in the streets making noise, and their voices get hurt, then the politicians respond. i think that is what we need -- and their voices get heard, then the politicians respond. i think that is what we need. you can see mitt romney's zipping over to the right as fast as he can -- this is to appease the right wing and the billionaires that are finding him. the community organizing groups, the faith-based groups, those pushing for a foreclosure relief and a higher minimum wage and a stronger jobs program, i think if the president gets reelected, and they are out there protesting in the streets, i think we will see a different kind of obama administration in the second term. tavis: you are not the first person that has said that he might be a differently if he gets a second term. i asked what in his backstory, what in his record, what in his life gives you reason to believe that he will respond to a progressive push? >> i think the best example of that was during the health-care debate. it looked like the president had given up, and all of a sudden, the folks were out there protesting in front of insurance companies, going over to the homes of c.e.o.'s, getting themselves arrested, and i think the president got a backbone as a result of that, and i think that is how we got health-care reform passed in 2010. people who believe that -- i think it was unrealistic. i think the history of this country is that when there is pressure from progressive, grass roots organizations, there are allies of the progressive movement regardless of what is going on in the streets, but i think president obama is going to read what is going on in the country and will respond to pressure. tavis: i dare not debate with you. you are the expert here. but if president obama was quick to respond to progressive pressure, the health-care debate would not have turned out to be what it was in the first place. it was a different policy than what came at the end. there was what he said on the campaign trail, and then when he got in, you water it down. with all due respect to the folks in the street, nancy pelosi got in his face and told him off and told rahm emanuel off and said, "i am not giving up all the i have done, making all of the sacrifices -- we are not going to give in on this legislation." "we are going to push this thing through." so nancy pelosi had a lot to do with pushing the president. he would not have been in trouble in the first place, and it would not have been so watered down. >> there is a great story in my book about how some activists were meeting with roosevelt during then,ssio depressren, any were trying to have some legislation passed, and he said, "i agree with everything you just said. now, go out and make me do it." i wish obama had learned that lesson. some of the high-profile people told the progressive activists to basically slowdown -- slow down. it took about one year into the obama administration before they did it up again. that is when the health-care debate got a second wind, and i think that is one of the lessons of this book. everyone to martin luther king to the current situation, you need people on the outside to keep people on the inside honest. tavis: i am glad you mentioned dr. king, one of the greatest americans of the 20th century. let me link king to obama, since you mentioned both of their names. president obama, on the fund- raising trail, he has said any number of times -- he has retold that story many times. i have got a whole bunch of romney questions, as well. so the president tells this story time and time again. i am not the only one. there are a lot of folks in the media who have written about this. he does not like progressives whining about this. rahm emanuel, so dismissive of the left, dismissive of progressives. so here is the irony of this. so dr. king is a famously known as foretelling lbj -- is with dr.known for telling lbj, king and asking martin to tone it down, and he said, "mr. president, it is the protests that are making a powerful." they find it annoying. they do not like the winding -- whining. it is a long way to say if you do not like being pushed by your left flank, if you do not like being pushed by people who are doing this, then what motivates you? >> there is what happens in the political atmosphere. there are a lot who need to be pushed. raising the minimum wage or doing something about jobs or immigration reform or protecting the rights of women to have choice. i think that those issues are going to come up in the second term, if there is a second term, and the protesters will make a big difference, because the moderate democrats will hear it. just as the moderate republicans had to listen to the tea party. they did not like it either. some of republicans, they did not want the tea party out there holding them accountable and holding their feet to the fire. the moderate democrats will respond to protests. there are people like nancy pelosi and others, other progressives in the senate and in the house that will keep these issues alive. tavis: are those persons in the social justice hall of fame, the 100 greatest americans in the 20th century, do they all come from the left? are there examples of people from the right who pushed for social justice? >> there were those who pushed thei vriews. when earl warren was the attorney general and then the governor of california, he was a conservative republican. in fact, he was one of those about in tearing japanese americans during the war. -- about treating the japanese americans one way during the war. there are a number of republicans in the book. in fact, in the early it 20th century -- the early 20th century, there were a few, the governor of california, and even fewer roosevelt, who has an ambiguous record. -- even theodore roosevelt, who has an empire -- -- an ambiguous record. there are people who kept it alive, like earl warren, who had a change of heart. tavis: let me ask you anyway, because i want to be fair to both sides. paul ryan, and there are those things that people say about him. lambasting his plan. but he, more than romney, more than obama, more than biden talks about the issue of poverty. he gave an entire speech about poverty in america. he has in his own way of dealing with the issue -- he has his own way of dealing with the issue. i wonder whether or not there is something to appeal specifically to him about why social justice matters, talking about the poor, raising the issue of poverty, even though he may be wrong. >> i think it is mostly lip service, to be honest. his voting record in congress is entirely about cutting budget priorities that help the poor. you do not see him supporting raising the minimum wage or supporting labor unions. you do not see him supporting expanding the earned-income tax credits or giving more money for public schools. there is a long history of catholic social justice, and a lot of people in my book reflect that. dorothy day. he is a right wing conservative, and he can try to mask that during the campaign, just as romney is trying to do that with some of his right-wing police, but i think if they get elected, it will be a disaster -- romney is trying to do that with some of his right-wing beliefs. a saving grace if romney and ryan get elected -- the best hope for progress of politics in this country is for obama to get reelected and then to be pushed by cresson's -- by progresses. fighting for union rights, fighting on behalf of the disenfranchised, and i think that movement, as it appears today in the form of community organizing, like the alliance of californians for community empowerment, and the national people's action, if they get a second wind, in some part because the occupy wall street movement helped to change the country -- people are talking about the incredible power of wall street and the right wing of billionaires, -- right winged billionaires -- the mood of the country is much different. the polls show that even republicans think that big corporations and wall street have too much power, so there is a movement under the surface that is going to explode and make a big difference. tavis: everything you just said is predicated on the notion or the belief that those persons who care about social-justice issues are going to activate themselves, that they are going to use the agency that they have, that they are going to, to put it another way, are going to assign themselves. that is a big if. i raise that because in his first term -- i understand the second term is very different. in the first term, so many social-justice stalwarts have been silenced by the obama administration. they have been silenced. we are your best hope. what do you want? boss or romney? the unions have not been as vocal or strong -- us or romney? the unions have not been as vocal or strong. i will not run the list. the environmental movement. there are bits and pieces here and there. the occupy movement came out for a while. some have been sidelined and silenced in the first term, hoping to get a second term, that he will become a real fighter, that he will become an lbj or an fdr. tell me why that you think these persons, in the spirit of these great americans who live today, are going to take up the gauntlet in the second term. >> i think after obama got elected in 2008, these progressive activists got a little seduced by being close to power, and the obama inside staff people were pretty good at seducing them, and i think there is still a bit of that, but i think after four years of frustration, there have been some good things, but it clearly frustrated a lot of people who thought it would be a much more progressive administration, and even counting the right-wing assaulted -- assault in congress, i think people are aware that if you are going to make progress in the second term, there has to be something out there. a group of men organizing groups here in california tried to get a home on a bill rights -- a group of various organizing groups here in california try to get a homeowner's bill of rights. governor brown signed that bill, which really pretax a lot of people from the worst parts of foreclosure -- which really protects a lot of people from the worst parts of foreclosure. the grass-roots movement is ready to explode, and i think that you are right that the obama administration may or may not welcome that, but it does not matter. if it happens, they will be held accountable, and i think that is a good thing, and that is what the history of the 20th century teaches us. tavis: just looking at the cover of the book, for get cracking a book, just looking at the cover, some of the greatest -- forget cracking the book, just looking at the cover, some of the greatest americans and the issues that they fought for and the game that they won, they haven't benefited all americans. -- they have benefited all americans. i am not naÏve in asking this question, but why is it that those on the right do not understand that when there is a push for this kind of social justice, we all win? >> it turns out in 1911, the first socialist congress, one man introduced the first social security bill. at the time, people thought that was a radical idea, a socialist idea, and then franklin roosevelt passed social security during the depression, and now 75% of the tea party members think that social security is a good thing. the right-wing conservatives understand and believe that the government has a responsibility to protect the vulnerable, to protect the elderly, so i think people do get misled fairly easily. they are good at misleading people on gun-control, abortion, gay marriage, things like that, but the churches, the right- winged conservative evangelical churches, they have a social- justice, upon it to them, as well. -- they have a social-justice platform to them, as well. i think that corporate america that is funding the tea party, they have a different agenda than the grass roots people. they want lower taxes on the rich. they want to get rid of labor union. they want to promote more inequality and give people at the top more of the wealth of this country, and i think people on the progressive side have to find a new way of talking about that, and i think that has been happening in the last couple of years, and particularly after occupy wall street. the growing inequality in america. tavis: the americans who pushed forward and advanced all types of social-justice issues, and we are talking all types of people. >> yes. tavis: because of cynicism and a number of issues, it is hard for individuals to get the kind of attraction that they did back in the day because institutions have so much more power now than they ever had. the institution of wall street. the institution of lobbyists. political parties, etc. so how do people breaks through -- breakthrough -- break through those that have the power? >> the labor union has been weakened, but there are signs of a growing labor movement. immigrants, african-americans, women, so i think the labor movement has pushed back in the last couple of years, and i think we will see a revitalization of organized labor. if you look at the things that were considered radical back then, social security, women's right to vote, dismantling jim crow and poll taxes and things like that, the minimum wage, protecting the environment, giving workers the right to unionize, those are all things that were once considered radical and are now considered a common sense. most of the women at occidental college do not believe themselves to be feminists, but they believe in the equal right to work and being able to choose and that a woman ought to be able to go to medical school or law school regardless of gender. if we remind people that it takes struggle, it takes protest, as frederick douglass said, if there is no protest, there is no progress, then people get out in the streets. i think, as i said, bubbling under the surface, there is that movement. if it was 1959, and i told you there is going to be a civil rights movement, most people would think that i was crazy, and yet, a few months later, these four students take over the woolworth's, and that set off a new wave of civil rights activism. tavis: there are a great number of people in this book whose names i expected to find. i see ella baker, thurgood marshall, others. does that say dr. seuss? >> yes. tavis: how did dr. seuss and make this hall of fame? >> what people did not know about him, before he was a famous children's author, he was an editorial cartoonist, and a lot of his children's books have a subtle but very obvious to some people, if you look for it, social-justice a theme. there is one metaphor for hitler. it is about a bully who abuses its power, -- his power. there is a book about two sides, two different groups of people who were trying to get bigger weapons to kill each other. and one was a dr. seuss book that is not a movie. it was about the environment and how corporate greed was destroying the environment. a generation of young people have been reading dr. seuss to each other for many years. maybe they were not aware that there is a message of social justice and what theodore geisel once said, i do not like people pushing other people around. that is what it is about. tavis: when you get this book, it is hard to imagine what america would be like without these 100 greatest americans of the 20th-century. the book is written by occidental professor peter dreier, and i am glad to have you on the program. >> thank you. tavis: that is our show for tonight. you can download our app. as always, keep the faith. >> for more information on today's show, visit tavis smiley at pbs.org. tavis: hi, i'm tavis smiley. join me next time for a continuation of our health serious. that is next time. we will see you then. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to
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Oct 5, 2012 12:30am EDT
>> roe:ng fundi for charlie rose hasbeenun provided by the coca-up c, somnyup stporting this program since 2002. and american express. additional funding provided by these funders. and by bloomberg, a provider of multimediwspa ne dul tidia news and information services worldwide. be more, pbs. tavis: good evening. from los angeles, i am tavis smiley. tonight, a conversation with actor turned travel writer andrew mccarthy. the former star is out with a book detailing his travels around the globe the text is called "the longest way home." in his role at editor at large for national geographic traveler, we are glad you have joined us. >> there is a saying that dr. king had said, there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only about halfway to completely eliminate hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: please welcome andrew mccarthy to this program. he is now an award winning travel writer that serves as an editor at large for national geographic travel. the his critically acclaimed book is called "along the way home." nice to have you on this program. i assume that you must be tackled at the reception this book is receiving. >> it is also a huge relief because it is a complicated thing. it is a relief when it is received in a nice way so that it can stand and rise and fall on its own as opposed to some weird baggage it gets from being my history. tavis: yeah, yeah. were their doubts or trepidation about putting a buck out where travel is that the epicenter of that? and it is about your life. any fear about being so transparent? gosh no, that is the short answer. the book turned out more personal than i thought it would be when i began, but i did not want to write a travel book perce. travel was the form i have been writing about for the last 10 years, a platform that i understood. i use travel to seoul dilemmas and answer questions that i have in life. i have questions i needed answered and i traveled. i traveled with this bill lamm of that i had. it was an internal thing that plays out in 3 d, kilimanjaro and the amazon. it had to be personal if it was going to be anything, otherwise it is just random travel. tavis: that the question you were trying to answer was? gosh i had been gauged for a number of years and i found myself unable, at a certain way, to get married. i thought i suffered from that i love you, i have got to go syndrome. the paradox of really wanting to be here and part of the yearning to be on my own. reconciling, i think, the need for community, commitment, intimacy, and the need for solitude. it is a problem i have wrestled with and there was no precedent for it. tavis: this conversation will get me in trouble and i was reluctant to even have it with you because it brings up personal drama. >> he realized a lot of people have this issue. this whole notion that we should be together all the time or we are not is crazy. and so i find it a very common ailment and i suppose in days long ago, men would be gone for a long time and come back. my wife -- we have us, and that i can have me. we express the same thing from polar opposites. tavis: how would you explain -- i ask this again, i was joking ago about the fact that my personal life came to me when i got a chance to read your book. i had the most difficult time as a single man. i have never found success trying to explain to a girlfriend literally, why is that i need time alone to travel. if i get a couple weeks off from the tv show, you are expected to spend the time with your girlfriend because they don't see you enough as it is. but to explain i have three weeks off, spending a weekend with you and we could have to be bought myself to think and have some solitude. that is the most difficult things for guys to explain to companions, sometimes. >> how did i sell that at home? i think my wife has her own vital life, so she has been waiting for me, for us to have a i my own life. i come back a better person for having been off and doing my thing. she wants that person. it is not particularly an issue. what i come back, she says, what are you doing here? men travel for work all the time. i am travelling to write magazine articles. i'm going to exotic places, but i think it is the natural rhythm of her relationship. >> but you were not traveling just for your job. it was laid bare and the book that for you, there is a need to be alone. traveling by yourself, it allows you to find answers and allows you to -- again, i am coming back to this because a lot of guys are watching and feel the same way. that private solitude is needed to be with oneself. i would never question a girlfriend doing that, take a couple weeks. >> you have to find another tavis:: -- another woman. tavis: enough said. so how did traveling on your own, getting out bear help you find the answer to your question? >> ha travel for me started as a young actor, i went to many places and i would get in the car and go to a location. and then i took a trip by what king along to spain. 500 miles across the north of spain and i read a book about it wants. i said, i am going to do that. i had never backpack or height. but i wanted to do that. i found myself walking across spain and i was miserable. i had one of those moments in where people talk about where i had a breakdown, a tin drum in the middle of a field where i was on my knees sobbing and screaming, this is horrible and not fair. why am i not appreciated. it was a real transformative moment for me. i had a sudden awareness sitting there sobbing that fear which had dominated my life up until that point in the way that i was never aware of existing until that moment, it's suddenly was lifted from me. i suddenly had much more space around me and in myself because i was relieved of this fear. i started traveling and i wanted more of that feeling. through traveling, i grew up. i was doing all these movies and so there was this kind of thing that happens. it allows me to separate from that and have my on experience. tavis: what were you afraid of? >> i have had a real struggle level live with ambivalence. i wanted success but i would pull away from that. i wanted to be intimate with you but yet, i have got to go. it was a constant push and pull of the two. i found out that that internal struggle is exhausting in you can't really make substantial progress. but i found myself fearful of people, of success, fear becomes a habit. fear masquerades as many things. it masquerades as common sense, exhaustion, anything. i am afraid of flying. it helped me to dissolve that, to a large degree. to where i was not going to be ruled by a and i became very aware of it. that is one of my big sell boxes. america is an amazing country and the think america is a very fearful place and we make many decisions based on fear, particularly political decisions. we make them on fear without proper information. if americans travel, they would see the world differently. travel is fatal to bigotry and narrow mindedness. the guy with the towel around his head is not trying to kill them, probably. if we travel, the world is safer. disagree witht you, citing in the statistics of how the overwhelming number of americans do not even of a passport. 70% of us do not of a passport. >> and half of those have used them. tavis: my question for you, why is it that we don't? arrogance, hubris, and narcissism? nationalism? why don't we travel the world more? >> what is arrogant but fear turned on its head and bravado? i think it is a fearful thing. we have everything in america, you can go to the grand canyon, why go anywhere else? the reason to travel as because of people and cultures, so i think it is fear and people really railing against me what i say this. it is money. people will defend and to fight until their fear is flawed. i don't think it is money. i show them by spend less money on the road that i do at home. one of the biggest and best sellers right now is called the kindness of strangers, a guy that traveled around without a penny. i think americans stay home. tavis: how did your travel ultimately in form, and pack your acting? or your development as an actor? >> helped me as a person. anything that helps develop you can get out of yourself as a person is going to help your acting. it helped me grow up in that way, and it helps me have more compassion and more curiosity. as an actor, you are interested in detail at the behavior of things. i do a lot of directing out, so it is interesting. acting is a veryct sjeubive point of view. as a director, you are interested in telling the whole thing from a bird's eye point of view. the writing is a combination of the two. they all kind of see each other. and it has given me a different creative outlet so i am not dependent on that. i feel i have to be creative every day to find myself, to locate myself. it doesn't have to be particularly good, does have to be in a state of creation. acting gives you a chance to do that and riding i can do myself and place myself much easier. tavis: i want to read this passage, but i want to come right back to the point you're making now about this freedom that you have found by not having to be tied. i was talking about how your travel influence your acting at the found this passage fascinating in your book. i've got this fascinating. i have often wondered why certain acting jobs come my way when they do. what is the lesson to be learned aside from the obvious challenge of the work. why cast as a little or when i am getting a divorce or why by castanet comedy what i'm going through rough patches? >> i love that. i love that my life constantly reflected my work. i am grateful that i have jobs that are seen within my life. it is not something i totally divorced from the y m. i am grateful i'm a part of my work and it is part of me and influencing things about myself. but that is fascinating to me. i am grateful i don't just have to do sprockets 100 times. i would go insane. i can imagine there is a certain freedom of that, too. it is always at work or at play, that is how i'll always live and feel comfortable. tavis: i have always believed in my own life that freedom is really about honda right to choose. so much of what happens is not about your right to choose but being chosen by somebody else, for the role, for the opportunity. how has this freedom to choose, to choose to act, right, travel, to direct. how has that freedom enhanced my work, not yours. >> i resent people having power over me in any regard. it was a chance for me to take myself back. i came to writing fairly late in life. so when i found it, it was a big relief in because i am also a fairly solitary person. it was something i could just do. and i didn't need you to bounce it off of. suddenly i wrote it and it exists. it has given me a sense of power in the good way, not power of assertion, but power of self possession. that ultimately makes me more generous and a better version of myself. the way i can open to you. if i need this acting job, a much more closed off to you. acting was the first time i found out where i would connect to something else tried to communicate that connection. that is always what i am sort of laughter. the paradox for me is that i am such a loner, and ultimately what i am after is connection with you. and then, of course, i want to flee. it is a constant struggle in life for balance. you go in one direction and i go another, if that makes any sense. tavis: i guess this does not surprise me given that nothing in hollywood surprises me, but it was fascinating about the way you were sold to us. you were part of a brat pack. not as a loner or college every individual which you now confessed to being. do you look back on those years, and what do you make? were we sold a false bill of goods as far as you're concerned? >> it was certainly an odd thing. in reality, nothing like that ever existed but it doesn't matter because it became a very is a piece saying he, and it is attached. i could land on mars and it will say andrew brat pack mccarthy land on mars. ballot has become the psychotic and friendly saying that whereas when it started, it was a very pejorative term. the last thing you want as an actor is to be locked had left out anything like that is limiting. i hated it when i was young and i ran from it, but you cannot run something like that. those movies now, i look at them. they pop up in the interviews as pieces and a look at them and myself, and i think, the acting is not that great in some of them, but there is a certain look in my eye that is so full that youthful thrill of we are right here, it is so great. i have a certain feeling that is very evident to me and i see it now from this distance. that a whole group of movies and actors, it was interesting because at that time, they were not well-respected films. less than zero did not make any money. it was terribly reviewed at st. almost fire, water views said it is an imitation of the show, a day late and a dollar short. none of these movies were well- regarded films, and now have taken on a certain stature. i think they did because this was the mid '80s when vcr had just sort of come into people's homes and a powerful way. people were renting movies, kids, instead of once or twice, you could make it watched 10 times are 15 times. it defined their youth and so i think it was a shock to everybody that they became so iconic. tavis: you say that you see in your eye as a youthful something. the eyes of the window to the soul, so when you look back yourself, were you what happy? you're running from success and intimidated by it, but were happy? >> not at all. was a thrill.at ias whr success, ied for didn't really know how to handle it and negotiate it. there was no sort of career planning going on with me. a movie about a medic in, and now i will do what about drug addict. i was frightened by it, because i did not feel i would be able to -- a lot was being heaped on me that i did not know was appropriate or valid or who i was. it was a peculiar time. but it defined became as a man. lately, when people ask me about it, i thought it would be interesting to have a parallel live to see how different i am because of that. and so it was an interesting thing. that probably helped propel me to travel more. and that has been a good day in. but it also gave me away in the world. i have no idea what i would have done if i had not become a successful actor very young. i got kicked out of college, i wasn't interested in school. just some feeling that i wanted to do something. tavis: how was the national geographic were coming? >> great. it is interesting because that magazine, that brand is so respected. it is wonderful for me because when i was starting to do is, you work for national geographic? it was instant respect. the guy from petty and paint -- in pink thinks he's a travel writer? it helped me spread out and do what i wanted to do. but i could tell stories, which is what i brought. tavis: how did you become such a good storyteller? >> i have been telling stories my whole life as an actor. i have seen so much bad dialogue, i know good dialogue. i just know, that is how i lived. my whole life has been storytelling in one form or another. my kids can't sit still at the dinner table. tell us the story. i like stories. forever in the world, that is how people communicate. tavis: he is a great storyteller whether he is acting, directing, or writing a book. it is called "along his way home." everybody is talking about it. the acclaim on this and what is beyond critical and you might want to add to your collection, written by andrew mccarthy. congratulations on the block. that is our show for tonight. i will see a next time on pbs. until then, keep the faith. >> for more information on today's show, visit tavis smiley at pbs.org. tavis: hi, i'm tavis smiley. join me next time for a conversation with rock star -- rap star t.i. that is next time, see you then. >> there is a saying that dr. king had said, there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only about halfway to completely eliminate hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> be more. pbs. >> be more. pbs.
WETA
Oct 16, 2012 12:30am EDT
tavis: good evening. from los angeles, i am tavis smiley. in just over 20 days, americans will head to the polls to determine the outcome of one of the most closely watched presidential campaigns in u.s. history. in a look at the state of the race and a preview of tuesday night's second presidential debate with the national affairs editor for new york magazine and co-author of the best selling text "game change." we are glad you have joined us. a conversation coming out right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had said, there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only about halfway to completely eliminate hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: job as the national affairs editor for new york magazine and a political analyst for msn bc. he wrote the best-selling book "game change. his eleion issue of new york magazine is on newsstands and he joins us tonight from new york. thank you for coming back. >> i am happy to be here. tavis: glad to have you. let me start with the obvious. tomorrow is a big night for the president. i suspect the format of this town hall set up that is very different from mano a mano might play differently to both of these guys but it doesn't put him in the position of having to be the enforcer tomorrow night. what do you make of that statement? >> the stakes are very high. people joke about these debates allot, but the president was widely received as a huge failure in denver two weeks ago. several million people watched that speech, more people than watched the debate in 2008 or more people that have ever seen the state of the union and he pretty much had a big belly flop. a lot of people around the country saw that debate and it has become an urban legend. like an alligator can out of the sioux were at 8 barack obama. i think the audience tomorrow night is going to be huge and people want to know, can he come back? what is his -- and what is his performance going to be like? governor romney has a lot of pressure on him. in terms of the format, it makes it harder when you are answering questions from voters. u-turn and give it to an attack on your opponent. there are a lot of things that president obama wants to contrast. it is harder to do that when you are answering a question. i think president obama will be faced with some difficult questions. the hardest question is someone going to say, i love you in 2008, i with dealing with actual human beings in almost wanted you to succeed, but you have really disappointed me. what will you tell me that will be different? and governor romney has never been goodany setting. ok, so that is a very high risk and high reward situation for him. he has moved his favorability numbers up considerably. if he knocks it out of the park, it could be a huge win for him. if he falters, it will be eradicated pretty quickly. if president obama faces that question, someone will say to governor romney, i work 40 hours a week but i am a member of the working poor. i don't pay income taxes. he said i am part of the 47% that is a mature and you can't help. explain to me why i possibly vote for someone that has that attitude. we will see how he reacts. tavis: i could not agree more with everything you have just said, which is what i was trying to say what i say if it plays to mr. obama is advantage. i did not say as well as you. that is what i was getting at, the format place to the president's advantage, dealing with human beings. the stakes are high tomorrow night, but i would be much more concerned if i am an obama supporter, more concerned on a one-on-one settings, more heartened by the fact that at least he is talking to everyday people. the toughest question he gets, he knows is coming tomorrow night. >> he had it in a town hall with cnbc, and i imagine he will be prepared for that kind of question. the other thing i am heartened by his by history. president obama has had bad performances in the past. particularly against hillary clinton that tried to clean his clock that a lot of those primary debates. president obama has a history, a great fourth quarter player. he doesn't seem batting cage, he exhibits some platitudes and he is not really fully there. speaking historically, when his back is against the wall, the stakes are highest and he usually rises to the occasion. an extraordinarily competitive politician. he knows how badly he did back in denver. it was a supporter of the president rooting for him, i would be counting on that history he has had of rising to big moments where he absolutely needed to win. tavis: i agree with you again that the president and his competitor, there are all kinds of stories and detailed articles written about his persona in the way that he often rises to the occasion. i am not into hot psychology, but what does this have to do with the fact that joe biden put some heat on him? that he was so good, he -- democrats believe that joe biden was so good that the president needs to step up his game cannot be i shined by his own vice president. >> some of that is true. and t other thing that biden did for president obama, reaction is split upon partisan ryan's -- lines. republicans thought he was rude and kind of a jerk. democrats thought he he was all part and they loved it. that has been one of the debates were the reactions were split pretty much down party lines. what he did more importantly is he through the kitchen sink at paul ryan. every argument he can possibly make. 47%, medicare, taxes, abortion. and what the obama team has done over the last year for days is they have showed that to a lot of focus groups and a lot of voters. they look to try to find out which of those arguments at home and which of those at attraction. allowing the preredent to cherry pick from his performance the homing on issues that seem to have the most traction with voters. when you see president obama focus on one or two of those issues, those are the ones that resonate. tavis: is there any way that the debate tomorrow night between obama and ronnie could crawl a more stark contrast between the choices between biden and ryan? i have a hard time believing how either one of them make a lot more definitively clear. >> part of the reason for that is governor romney doesn't want it to be started. -- stark. whether you say he was evasive, untruthful, pivoting, or whatever you call it, he clearly made the move to the metal in one fell swoop. he did not gradually edged towards the center from having been out further in the extreme, he did not do it gradually. he did it in one big chunk, and i think he has been talking about bipartisanship. it works trying to get to the center, talking about bipartisanship and adopting a much softer tone. he will try to obscure the clarity of the choice. tavis: with the moderate romney show up? >> absolutely. a lot of things went right for the debate in denver. i think they also really feel that him going back to what they see as his moderate and pragmatic massachusetts' route was a winner for them with the voters. i think they will double down on that. tavis: it was about foreign policy exclusively but it doesn't mean that it won't come up tomorrow night. in answer to some question, whether it is relevant or not, he is going to get that yen. what is your sense over the last few days about what they think they are making on the libya issue and what they are trying to hide? >> and the president is playing a bad hand here. at the facts are bad. the administration has not satisfactorily accounted for what happened. we don't know if it was an intelligence failure, some kind of a cover-up, the stories have changed. most voters don't care and are focused on issues that are closer to home. i think it is all of the governor romney. seizing on this issue, as with the case with a lot of foreign policy issues, tried to use it as a metaphor for strength. president obama has had the lead in foreign policy and is seen as a strong early. that is traditionally where republicans have strength. i think governor romney sees this as a way of taking away from president obama is a strength -- obama's strength. they think they have a winning hand on the feed, if not because the actual issue is going to change very many votes on the ground. tavis: if you are undecided, what are you undecided about? >> i think there is a subset of a very small group, it has been true for a month. i think you have people that are mostly in the category of the "i like president obama, i wanted him to succeed, the economy has not improved to the extent i hoped it would. i am not totally confident or trusting of the economic management and his ability to make washington work when he ran in 2008. i am not sure that governor romney appreciates my struggles. i am not sure that he understands the average person and what they have to go through. i don't know that he shares my values or cares about me. they are still uncomfortable, but they are not yet sold on governor romney. it is some combination of things. the responses that will bring those people to have decision over the next few weeks. tavis: sequestration is a good word on the scrabble game and it is a horrible word for politics. it might come out tomorrow night as well, mr. ryan has advanced in the media the notion that if they were to win, there would be a better chance at making sure that these automatic cuts that most americans have heard about are scheduled to kick in after the first of the year will not taken because they will be in the white house and have a much better chance of working with republicans to avoid u.s. going over that cliff. is that an argument he can sell effectively tomorrow night? >> governor romney has said that he doesn't want those issues to be dealt with in a lame-duck session. the sequestration vote which is $500 billion in defense cuts, $500 billion in cuts to social programs and discretionary spending, they would have to be kicked down the road until after he got inaugurated. i think it is one of the most powerful arguments he has always had, which is to say that before the campaign, he was going to be post partisan and bring the capital the other and move us past of the mindless polarization of the last 20 years. you and i both know that there is plenty of blame to go round, republicans have opposed president obama throughout his term. president obama has not worked with capitol hill with republicans or democrats particularly well. he was the one that promised to fix it in his campaign. he brought this up with his convention speech and he is bringing it home, the simple argument of why would a voter think that the next four years, president obama will make washington work together? why will he be able to work with republicans the next four years? i think it has an intuitive appeal. tavis: the article about bill and hillary clinton, as you know, we have been talking about poverty and we have discussed this together. i have been troubled by the fact that in the first two debates, i was told they did a much better job than jim lehrer did. respectfully. but no question about poverty. the numbers are very clear. it is threatening our very democracy. you know the story line as well as i do, but no moderator has asked the question directly about poverty and the poor. tomorrow night, might we get a question about that specifically from someone that is living in impoverished conditions? >> i hope so. is a way tok there downplay poverty, but the one thing i will say is that he did a great job. that debate was 70 minutes on foreign policy. if you match that with most americans, if that is not whose last three of their concerns, we have not talked about poverty or immigration. we have not talked about gay marriage, sensitive social issues. i have no idea what is going on in the heads of voters. moderating this third debate, she gets to call the questions from the audience and she gets to choose who gets to speak. i am sure she will be focused on some issues that have not been aired in the first two. poverty is incredibly important, incredibly important to you. i think that both candidates know which ones have not asked. there are probably pretty well prepared answer those questions. some of those issues are not being raised on the campaign trail. tavis: to the issue of new york magazine, it is a wonderful cover that lays out a variety of issues. you get top billing and a wonderful pieceut abo about the clintons. i was anxious to get to it because everybody knows that bill did his thing at the democratic convention. he is back in full effect. >> the most striking thing to me, they have been the development of his importance in this race. there is no one in the obama world -- many people at the senior levels of that campaign said to me that his speech was the single most important moment of the campaign so far. we could see it in poland and for this groups, that is when the corner got turned on president obama's ratings as an economic manager. he is running a little bit ahead of them, and the right track- wrong track. literally the moment that bill clinton stopped speaking, no president, not even me, could have fixed the problems in just four years. that is probably the most important single sentence. it is amazing, if you remember how much bitterness there was between president obama and bill clinton together. the story is how the two of them got over that alienation between the two of them over the course of the last four years. the longtime clinton person says, it is totally transactional and highly functional relationship now. they are both getting something out of it and they care about the policies that president obama represents which is almost entirely the same policy that bill clinton inherited -- embrace. tavis: what does clinton get out of this relationship at this point your comment a moment ago? >> i think president clinton gets a couple of things out of it. he knows bill clinton as well as anybody, he loves to be needed as much as he needs to be loved. he is needed in this campaign, and you can tell, again, they have said to me, bill clinton didn't win this election, you're giving too much credit to him. if you go across the country, and they run the bill clinton ads making a case for obama is re-election, 16,000 times in the swing states. there are advertisements out there that show bill clinton and president obama as if they were running mates. that is really great for his ego. he gets to see clintonism. what he brought into the world. his rightful place, barack obama ran as an antidote to clinton. that is too much triangulation, to incremental. i'm going to be post partisan and transcendent and visionary. now he is not running as an antidote, he is running as the inheritor. i am the one to carry the clinton creek forward. he gets back and he also gets with that, the restoration. that can't help but help hillary clinton if she decides to run in 2016 which everyone around her think she is going to do. at one me to do obama? -- want me to do obama? he gets the most widely respected and almost neutral economic orbiter, the highest approval rating, 69% who is taken and associated with this period of peace. he can talk owls down from the trees. the best spokesman in the history of the world. and to make his case for working-class and middle-class voters. they found it hard reach as a candidate in 2008 and as president. he gets a huge boost toward his reelection. he gets a big boost in what will be a very tight race. tavis: what does it say about our politics that the first african american president, even after one term, still leave the white guy to get him elected to a second term? >> i think bill clinton will set the default is barack obama's. you hear all these things about president clinton, about how he doesn't take care of his daughters and dozen jews enough on capitol hill. he thinks that president obama has failed to go out and sell the policies of the country. to make a clear and convincing educational argument for the obviously clear choice for electing -- is being elected president. barack obama gets the big stuff right and doesn't do the easy stuff out all. what he means by that, here is a guy with extraordinary communicative capacity. what he said before charlotte was that people need education, not eloquence. his frustration with president obama is that he has not done that. he would be able to make this case on its own. tavis: other questions, you mentioned barack obama wanting to the post-partisan. barack obama doesn't really care about the infrastructure and the party -- the party politics. how does bill clinton's reemergence put him back in charge of fastening how the dnc moves forward? >> until hillary clinton decides what to do, the field will be wide open. a lot of donors in the country are not going to put anybody behind anybody until they know what her move is. if she decides to run, she will be, almost by acclamation, the democratic nominee. there is a much loved, a sense that they may very typical choice between two historic possibilities that it is time for a woman, and this is the woman. because president obama doesn't particularly care about choosing a successor and has never been interested in the party structure, the clintons together will become the to 800 pound gorillas or the 1,600 pound twin guerrilla that will be at the absolute center of gravity for the democratic party. tavis: it is hard to find anybody better at this, the author of the best seller "game change." and the author of a new magazine, bill and hillary forever. i'm sure they love the title. thank you for your time. that is our show for tonight, you can download the application next time -- as always, keep the faith. >> for more information on today's show, visit tavis smiley at pbs.org. tavis: hi, i'm tavis smiley. join me next time for a conversation with -- following the debate at a look at why social issues have not played a major role in this campaign. that is next time, see you then. >> there is a saying that dr. king had said, there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only about halfway to completely eliminate hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> be more. pbs. >> be more. pbs.
WETA
Oct 6, 2012 1:00am EDT
tavis: good evening. from los angeles, i am tavis smiley. tonight, a conversation with grammy-winning rap artist t.i > he has faced his share of adversity over the past several years, to be sure. including high-profile legal problems in addition to a forthcoming cd. a new book called trouble in triumph, we are glad you have joined us. >> there is a saying that dr. king had said, there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only about halfway to completely eliminate hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: please welcome t.i. back to this program out with a later cd -- with a cd later this year. he has also just released a new book. of or get to that, here is video for go get it. ♪ ♪ tavis: and now a book. you stay busy, man. how have you been? >> i have been blessed. tavis: david work on you with this pro
WETA
Oct 2, 2012 12:00am EDT
tavis: good evening. from los angeles, i am tavis smiley. a conversation with sheila bair. one of the heroes of the financial crisis. she has just released a new text. the book is called "bull by the horns." we're glad you have joined us. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: sheila bair is the former chair of the fdic. her efforts to take on wall street excess and stand up for average americans is the subject of the new text "bull by the horns." good to have you on this program. >> thank you for having me. tavis: let me start with the news of this week. everybody knows in 48 hours, for the first time, mitt romney and mr. obama will come face to face in a debate. if you were jim wedne
WETA
Oct 8, 2012 6:00pm EDT
strategic decisions. we offer expertise and tailored ofes industries. what can we do for you? presd tet,by kcet, los angeles. s
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Oct 11, 2012 12:00am EDT
tavis: good evening. from los angeles, i am tavis smiley. tonight at conversation with one of classical music's stars, lang lang. he has an all chopin disk. he is performing to benefit the lang lang international music foundation. a conversation with lang lang coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we tworkheogeter, we wworkn stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: always pleased to welcome lang lang, the hottest artist on the classical music planet albm"edchchase e ne and will be performing a special concert on october 30 benefiting his international music foundation and this past summer he just turned 30, not bad for a guy who has made the "time 100" list. so much to get to. some of the making of the chopin album. ♪ >> japan is not just exercisers -- chopin is not just exercise your fingers. today i want to start playing again. i'm not just focused on technical point but i realize why i'm doing this interpretation. over the years we learned how to serve for the musical [inaudible] ♪ tavis: when we sat down, japan has a special place in my heart. -- chopin has a special place in my heart. i recall saying to the teacher, who is this "choppin" guy? i came to appreciate the work. why take on this project now? 30 --ce i am turning for me, i alayways love to play chopin. i never actually recorded a chopin solo album. i am recording some of his etudes. he makes everyone practice really hard. eart felt passion. and the "minute waltz" is the first piece, every kid playing, it is that. a friend. tavis: i love the word that you used in that piece talking about this project. you referred to this as your interpretation of chopin. that is all that any artist can do is to interpret the work. but when you sit down to interpret his work, what are you trying to get us to hear? what are you trying to deliver to us through your unique interpretation? >> his music is very romantic. he is basically the main person for creating piano music. for me, he is not just very beautiful, very melancholy. he is very exciting and dynamic. sometimes the intent -- we forget about that. we only talk about his beautiful part. i think he has a lot of passion. such incredible energy, intensity. that comes up also sometimes. tavis: when you were here last, you were talking about your -- memoir. your book came out. since you were here last, your father put a book out about his life with you. you wrote your book -- your book was dedicated to your father. he was very tough on you when you were a kid, your father was. is dedicated your book and you are 30 and her father wrote a book about his life with you. what most wounded your touch do about what your father had to say about you in his book? >> i was crying when i was reading his book. it is only in chinese but it will be translated. i realize actually he was, he was a warm person but he is trying to hide his emotions. for me, it feels kind of strange. i thought he was very strict. i thought he was very crucial. he really loved me so much in a very different way than what i thought. there are many stories he shared. like decisions, where he made those decisions. -- why he made those decisions. i really respect because after so many years it feels like i'm starting to realize how, to know my father as a person rather than just a father. quite emotional when i started reading. tavis: you mentioned where father's book is just dying chinese but it will be translated into english but -- your father's book is in chinese but it will be translated into english. what you make of the lang lang effect? there are 40 million people, you are riresponsible for 40 million chinese who are taking piano. you push them into this by your success. how does it make you feel? >> it feels good but at the same time i hope the kids learning piano because they are loving music. sometimes you know the big difference that if your parents are pushing you rather than you want to do something, it is to complete different worlds. when i started teaching kids in china or around the world, i always want to say that. you need to start loving what you do first. then you realize what you're doing that. otherwise it is wasting of time. tavis: how did you and why are you so passionate about kids? it is impossible to talk to you for more than two or three minutes without hearing directly from you, without feeling the passion that you have four children, for teaching them piano in this country, around the world. you do not have kids yet. and yet you have this passion. always have had for kids. where did that come from? >> because i know how music changed my life. i know from the beginning, music became my best friend. piano became my soul mate. and how i learned from music and how i learned from theth peopl around music. music took me to another level which totally open up my mind. and gave me so much inspiration to do better in many areas. not just musically but to be a better person and to be more creative. and to communicate with different people around the world and to basically create a better surrounding of our society. i think today we need to help to educate more kids and inspire them to learn music. we hope that music will inspire them. tavis: talk to me why it specifically you think classical music, your specialty and your renown is in the classical field. a lot of these kids are taking a classical music. what you think classical music has to offer young people? >> classical music has a deep meaning. maybe it is harder to understand. comparing classical music to barack or hip-hop. it takes us -- rock or hip-hop. it is -- if it is difficult to understand it means the performances bad. is bad.erformance maybe some art takes more time but when you get it, it stays there. tavis: i wrote this down. i have this written down because i wanted to walk through because the work that you are doing with young kids is so powerful and moving for me. this performance coming out is to benefit your foundation but i want to give the audience a sense of all the different things that you do with young people. because there are some different programs. you have the young scholars program. tell me about the young scholars program. >> we have 12 young pianists from age 8 through 14 around the world. we have three in the u.s., three in asia, and three in europe. three from other parts of the continent. we help them to have a better opportunity to perform with a wonderful orchestras at such an early age and also some of my teachers, we will teach them as well. give them the master class. i give them three months, one master classes in three months and some of those kids already played by themselves and also with me three times at carnegie hall. i am really proud of the process of those kids. they are improving every day. you see it. and when they perform, they are totally sure they totally share their par with everyone. tavis: another program called lang lang and friends live. >> this is in carnegie hall we're actually doing that. this concert will have a great actor like alec baldwin, he will be the host and my friend and i will play a duet and will have a great jazz singer, we will do "sound of music" together and we will play six of these dollars. tavis: there's the piano master class and the 101 pianist's that we saw a moment ago. there is the in school music program. many people saw you on oprah winfrey. i cannot imagine they will ever forget that as long as they live, being with you on national television. you and these three kids pulling together. that is what changes lives. >> for me that was a highlight of the foundation, to be part of searching the smartest kids on the planet. and i had a great chance to take this three kids to play with me on that stage. it was beautiful. tavis: this may be a silly question but let me ask for your take on this. do you think that you are still getting better as an artist? >> i think this year the performance from in standing is better than last year. somehow. maybe i slept more this year. tavis: every time i hear you, i am not a creek. i think you are all that and then some. when you say you are getting better and you think your performances are better, what is your unit of measurement? how'd you come to this conclusion that you were better now than a year ago? based on what? >> that is a great question. i am trying to sit in a more accurate way. first of all, every year you learned all things and in one year you are working with a lot of musicians. last year had a great privilege andork with herbie hancock' the great conductor who played in the opening london olympics. and also i met so many great artists from the pop world as well. watching live shows, live concert, live operas, all those things, you learn those things in piano playing and i give you a different dimension on the keyboard. experience, learning experience, concert, whenever you see. tavis: because i love and respect herbie, when you get a chance to spend time with him, what do you take away from the experience with playing with a guy like herbie hancock? >> every note he touches is like a diamond. to have that touch, to hear that and to play four hands and have a kind of touch, it is an amazing experience. he has so many great friends like quincy jones. imad currency already five times. -- i met quincy already five times. tavis: q does have a legendary life style. love him. tell me about what is on this -- on "the chopin album." >> we have 12 etudes which are difficult to perform. on the dvd part, there's a video shof when i was playing the etudes when i was 12. there is the chopin "nocturnes," which are the most beautiful. tavis: what makes the etudes so difficult to play? when you say it is difficult given how proficient you are, i take your word that it is difficult to play. what makes it so difficult to play? >> some of the etudes like "the soter wind," is iit is difficult. the figuring is hard to play even. it is already difficult but it is level one. and how to make those runs like winds, like rote coasters in the most beautiful, artistic ways rather than playing like a scale. like other your neighbors. so that takes time. in need to -- you need to have a power balance mentally and physically. that takes a long time to practice. that is just the technical side. there is some music. i still remember when i was a kid i found this beautiful music but i did not understand what is the meaning under the notes. now start to play, i start to digest, almost like drinking a cup of tea and digest. tavis: to your point about the technical proficiency that you have to have to take -- place of the the tubes -- etudes. prince and i were having a conversation. it was specifically about how he knew that he was -- how he knew he was playing his best, that he was really giving the kind of interpretation he wanted to give. he is not playing classical stuff but the conversation was about the fact that critics will tell you, music critics will tell you when you think -- they think you are on or off when you got it just right or you had a horrible performance. so often, these critics are not anywhere near as proficient as you are. there critiquing you but they could not do it if you had a gun to their had so people can critique prince but put the guitar in their hand, they fail, i say all that to ask that how do you know when you have got this thing just right? it cannot be because the critics tell you that. there has to be something beyond the critics. how you know when to get japan just right -- chopin just right? it is something you feel, is it some who tells you, someones opinion you trust? >> a combination. first of all, yourself knows where is the problems. tavis: you can feel it. >> and you practice all those problems and you need to find someone who really understand who you are. in the past it was like my father. my piano teachers. when i turned 30, it cannot have them next to you. you need to have some music friends who knows what they're doing and they start listening to some recording -- you send a recording to them or download a live concert and get a second opinion. at the same time to listen to some other recordings from the past. like arthur rubinstein. to get some ideas of how musicians were interpreting the same work 50 years ago. and to see how do you do it now in the 21st century but still kept the tradition. and of course, when you get a lot of comments about your playing it is good things but if you listen carefully with every comment, it drives you nuts. some people say i think this should be like that. this should be the opposite. what i like going to do -- what am i going to do? you will find your own way and to believe it. you will be confident with what you're trying to do but in the same time, try to open your ear up for good suggestions. tavis: i will take that. i found this to be fascinating and i am sure you know this having done your research. chopin's 30 public appearances in a lifetime. 30 public appearances. lang lang, 130 public appearances every year. chopin, 30 appearances lifetime. lang lang, 130 appearances throughout the year. what do you have to say about that? >> it is a different time. it would take a whole day from one village to another village. from europe to america takes a few hours. tavis: that is a lot of playing, though. >> yeah. chopin was also a great composer. he needed to write every day. the the thing about me is we didn't have that challenge because there are so many great works. tavis: is composition something you want to do more of? >> i can do raytown's. -- ring tones. tavis: it is a different era. chopin was not doing ring tones. that is funny. the new lang lang is called "the chopin album." lang lang fans like yours truly will want to add that to your collection. you come back any time. >> next to my place something. tavis: i said that. i can't afford the kind of piano he plays to get tuned. next time you come in i will find a piano. every time you come in you never play. promise you do it? handsll we do it for hanour also? tavis: i will do it with you. that is our show for tonight. thanks for tuning in. as always, keep the faith. ♪ >> for more information on today's show, visit tavis smiley at pbs.org. tavis: hi, i'm tavis smiley. join me next time for a conversation with phiphyllis bennett. that is next time. will see you then. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> be more. >> be more.
WETA
Oct 20, 2012 12:30am EDT
tavis: good evening. from los angeles, i am tavis smiley. tonight, a conversation with michael chiklis, the former star of "the shield," who is once again finding success on primetime with a cop drama called "vegas." it debuted as number one -- as the number one new fall series. a conversation with michael chiklis coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have a lot of work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: pleased to welcome michael chiklis back to this program. the star of "the shield" is back in prime time with tv's most- watched new show, "vegas." the show airs tuesday night at 10:00 on cbs. here is a scene. >> i tailored every last detail. my best room, my best boost -- booze. they let you win. that is because you cannot handle your losses like a man. having said that, we took an oath. you want me to take anyone out, i will. i got to admit, i enjoy it. but it is the wrong move. not because he is a decent man, he is not. not because it will come to our side, he will not. if we take him out, best-case scenario, the feds do not come after us, the state does not revoke our gaming license, but we still have two dead sheriff's in one month. tavis: i want to jump ahead. i will explain what the series is about in a minute. you always seem to play these guys who are teetering on the line. you are walking the tightrope. if you are a cop, you are being tempted to cross the line. when you are trying to be a good guy, there is a bible verse that says, "when i would do good, evil is present." they are trying to pull you back in. what is it that you love about playing these guys who are walking this line? >> part of it is the way i look. honestly, i gravitate to characters like that. i think they are really interesting. tavis: and complex. >> exactly. i played characters who were white-headed. when i did "the commish," he was a good guy, period. given a choice between good and evil, he would pick good every time. that was fun and lovely and it was great for my mom to watch. in terms of interesting and something to delve into as an actor -- i think that, what we do as actors, we are sort of behavioralists. we look at someone and try to walk a mile in their shoes. it is an interesting exercise to try to put yourself in someone else's shoes and see the world through their perspective. vick mackie, from "the shield," i could not have a more different perspective on life than this man. if he was a man who started as an idealist and spiraled into corruption, this is a man who started in corruption and is trying to rise from that mocked and mire of corruption in to legitimacy. a lot of the gangsters of that era came where they were either immigrants or sons or daughters of immigrants who had this american dream of becoming part of the establishment. they were willing to do things that were dark in order to -- i was going to say set the pick for their children. tavis: you have been hanging out with the celtics to long. too big a boston fan. >> here it is, wto generations later, and their sons and daughters are legitimately running vegas in a corporate manner. this mob is gone. tavis: you talk about actors walking a mile in the shoes of others and interpret that on the screen. i want ask what your learning by walking in the shoes of a wise guy. before i ask that, i think the president to that has to be explaining what the series is. you start to do that. dennis quaid plays the sheriff. >> which he plays ralph lamb. we had the honor of meeting ralph ilham. he is an incredible maverick of a guy. word has been destroyed, to a great degree. but he is a real maverick. 86 years old, i would not mess with him today. he is a real tough guy, military police officer turned it ranch sheriff. his family lived in that area since the wars. they came to him and asked if they could help him to solve a crime. he ended up taking a job as a sheriff in vegas when there were 15,000 people living there. from the time he became sheriff or last 20 years -- over the next 20 years, his reign, if you will, over 3 million people moved into that area and millions of dollars. when you have that influx of population and money, stuff is going to happen. people are elbowing for position, vying for power in this burgeoning place called vegas. and it exploded. guys like my character came from -- nick said something interesting, he called it "the u.n. of the mob." families from all over the country. what they did was stop their flag in the sand in the form of a hotel and casino. they had to interact in a way that they had never had to interact before because they had this city's separating them and they had to interact with the local law enforcement and local government. the local government is going, what is going on here? vegas was part of nevada and utah were mormon. the center of power used to be in salt lake city. it is still, to a degree. it was frowned upon. there was gambling and prostitution down there. with all this money, i think the folks up there when, hey, we should get our hands around this and get control of the situation. it made for strange bedfellows. really odd marriages of really different cultures in a way that we had not seen before. tavis: what are you learning so far about walking in the shoes of a wise guy, trying to go good? >> is really an interesting perspective. let's -- try to divorce yourself from me for a moment. this is part of my process. reading, talking to individuals, taking in information from whatever quarter i can find it. the attitude is, not speaking for myself, what separates me from law enforcement? nothing. they are just the people with the badges. they do things that are as corrupt and more corrupt than me. they are fighting for theirs. i am here so that i can get what i need for my family. not just my nuclear family, but my "family." that means being the best in business, being -- when i spoke to joe lee, one of the guys who is a consultant for us, he was telling me that 70% of what he would do, we were trying to get j. lo tickets when we were in vegas. he said, if i was still working, i would be running around, trying to get you the best tickets i could get you. they are entrepreneurs. it was all about earning and making their place the best place for everybody to come. ironically, a lot of what they did was about goods and services, business. the things that got in the way were any impediment to their business. that could come in a lot of different forms. you say, michael, you cannot go around killing people willy- nilly. part of it is mythology. the mythology we create. if your name is attached to the mythology, you are more likely to get the front table. you know what i mean? it is really kind of fascinating to look at all the ways they were able to manipulate things in their favor without actually having to do anything. tavis: did you find the j. lo tickets? >> oh yeah. tavis: i figured joey might have come through with the tickets. what is it about -- there are really two questions that you should not ask at once, but i will anyway. one is, what is it about las vegas that makes it an endless wellspring for storylines? for as long as there has been vegas, there have been movies and tv shows made about vegas. even though we have seen this stuff over and over, it never dries up. >> that is a great question. and the second one? >> the 1960's, nowadays, seem to be the same thing. whether it is "mad men," there are a bunch of them, but the 1960's starts to be that era that is kicking out a bunch of new content. >> i will take the second one first. part of it is, it is not so far in the past that it seems like some ancient times. it is one lifetime away from our parents -- it is one lifetime away. our parents grew up in it. you have these vague memories of grandparents dressed in this way. it was also a time where there was still a level of personal freedom that is somewhat lost now. there is a bit of romanticizing about that, i think. we talk about it as parents. how we would get on our bicycles in the morning and not come home until nightfall. there was this personal freedom. now we worry about the fact and cloister our children away in a way that is unprecedented. we know they are in this borat. that is a whole different issue. that feeds into it. something about the allure of that time. it was a sexy. . people wore suits to work. the women dressed to the nines, which must have been a pain, frankly. my wife looks at it and says, could you imagine? two or three hours per day just to walk out the door. so there is that. if the other question, vegas -- well, it is the adult disneyland, i guess. ironically, interestingly, i probably should not admit this but i am not a fake this guy. i have been there five times. maybe it is because i am a new england boy and the idea of parting with my money so quickly -- i am like a $5 tables guy. i have seen people come up -- i saw a guy lose somewhere in the neighborhood of $150,000 in four minutes on the craps table and my knees buckled. i am real world and i think to myself, the neighborhood i grew up in, what that would translate to. that is a college education. it is gone. and he did not even blank. look at the guy. well, he is cooler than me. but it is somewhere where legitimacy meets the darker side and the sinful side. it is a place where you can literally -- well, i cannot let my hair down, but other people can. [laughter] think about it. the slogan for the city is "what happens in vegas, stays in vegas." there is an alert to that. tavis: speaking of clustering children, you have a daughter who threw a hissy fit about because there was a chance that she might go away for school as opposed to being a trojan at usc. >> we are close. my family is tight. my oldest just became a freshman at usc. when she got into nyu, we were like, that is a great school, honey. are you going to go? [laughter] as it is, she has moved out of my house. it is a quieter house. autumn is a big presence. it led to my wife turning to me and saying, i have got to do something creative. she started a blog called "carpool, couture, and cocktails." the car pool is the mommies side, the couture is the adult -- is the fashion side, and the cocktail's is the adult side. tavis: that is, me is dealing with it. how is daddy dealing with it? >> i am going to a lot of usc football games. tavis: a bunch of footsteps and people start running. >> it is the biggest upside the ackie. played vick m boys are terrified of may. tavis: and you like it. look at that. >> it has an upside when you have a daughter. she is a little annoyed by it. we want to spend time together. tavis: how you dealt with being the only male in that house? i have a friend of mine who has three or four daughters. i tease him because i call him the ladies' man. he tried and he could not get a boy. how do you do that? >> i always joke that i was raised in testosterone. now i live in an estrogen house. it is me and my wife, my two daughters and even two female dolls. sensitivity has been beaten into me. i love it, actually. in a way, i have learned a lot through raising daughters. women are highly complex. again, i joke with them. i go, you have all these feelings. feelings everywhere. [laughter] men are very simple. i am a simple guy. i do not need much. give me a football game on sunday or a baseball game during the week and i am good. a beer and everything is fine. with girls, you get into these highly-philosophical, complex discussions. really stimulating to raise girls, in particular. to steal a quote from a famous movie, "they have made me a better man." tavis: how the navigated raising two girls in this society and seeing them out into the world. this is a very different world. >> talking and listening. i highly recommend listening. we have one rule in the chiklis house. tavis: it is really not a chick- less house. ba-dum-bum. >> if you tell the truth, you do not get in trouble. that is the only rule. tell me the truth and we will make it better. tavis: mom, did you hear that? that, did you hear that? it is way too late now. i told the truth and i still got a be down. but i digress, go ahead. >> it has worked out well. as a consequence, my children come to me with everything. we just talk and i listened to them. knowing their mind is a big deal. you cannot help it, as a parent, to have the instinct to want to off load every lesson you have ever learned, in part everything to your children so you end up pontificating a lot, just talking at them and they shut their heads off. i am not saying i am a perfect parent, but i think that one thing my wife and i got right was being engaged, attentive, listening as well as talking and being philosophical with the kids from a very young age and being truthful with them. tavis: the testosterone and estrogen distention notwithstanding, has there been trepidation about growing up in that community, the neighborhood you grew up in back in new england versus trying to raise kids in this environment? particularly in your environment of hollywood, with a father who is a start? >> sure, it poses challenges. autumn is the proverbial apples. she is studying theater and wants to be an actress. education is very important. that is why i insisted that she not go right into the pool right away, that she got an education. of course, there are a lot of temptations and everything. it is the same anywhere. you want to arm these children with anything that you can, in part any lesson that you can, talk to them. have a level of trust with them. they learned their lessons well and will make some mistakes. you let go and let them do their thing. that is true anywhere you are. hollywood might have some different challenges. there might be a certain level of -- but i think it is the same anywhere. kids can get into trouble anywhere. tavis: she said that she wanted to be an actor. she had to get an education so she is doing that now. that is what you told her. just between the two of us, how did you process your daughter telling us that she wanted the in the business you are in, knowing all that you know about this business? >> when i was 35, my dad and i were having a talk. i turned my father and i said -- he is a grounded birth and american guy from boston. i said, how is it possible that you not only sent me to college but send me to college to become an actor? how did that happen? he fixed me with that look that he gives me and said, "michael, do you think if i did not know it was who you were, i would have allowed it? that is quite a profundity from a working-class guy. it made me cry, actually. a lot of other friends of mine who are actors did not have that kind of support from their family. they pushed them out of it or said, you have got to get a real job. it is not a real profession. my father recognize that this is who i was. i think the same is true, as nervous and worried as i am for her, i have seen her and seen her work and flourish. it is just who she is. i cannot stand in front of that. i have to support her. tavis: how do you feel about this new product -- this new project, "vegas?" you got a few good years out of "the shield." >> it could be one of the best things i have ever done, if not the best thing. i do not take that lightly, especially having done "the shield." because of the people involved. this is an outstanding group of people, from the executive producers down to the bus boy. i have to give praise to a couple of our producers. arthur and kathy, for being so exacting and precise about the way they produce and the people they put in place. this is the first time i've ever walked on the set of a show and found that every department knew what they were doing. 3000 years worth of collective experience on the set. that is rare. usually, when you first start a television series, this guy is a little lame. you know what i mean? tavis: yeah, i know. just kidding. [laughter] >> there are always the weak links, but this was the smoothest one i have ever seen. there is the collective excitement that we're doing something special. the least-inspired part of the show is the title, frankly, but it is a program. it is vegas, baby, so we went with "vegas." tavis: i love
WETA
Oct 16, 2012 7:00pm EDT
joined by maria for more, i'm joined by maria de los angeles torres, a cuban-born american who is now the director and professor of latin american and latino studies at the university of illinois in chicago. her books include "by heart/de memoria: cuban women's journeys in and out of exile" and "the lost apple: operation pedro pan, cuban children in the u.s., and the promise of a better future." professor, cuba has been a particularly tough place for its citizens to travel from, for some time. if you stay out of the country for more than 11 months you lose your right to residency. you lose your health care. is this a big change? >> i think it's a very significant change to the extent that this law, which was actually called the law of definitive abandonment, a very brave world, if you will, kind of description here. and the law prevented cubans from returning. initially it was actually 60 days. the 11 months comes much later. but in 1961 if you left for whatever reason and did not return within 60 days, you lost your home, your property, and your right to be returned to your family. s
WETA
Oct 8, 2012 7:00pm EDT
. he also held fund-raisers in los angeles and san francisco. his campaign and the democratic national committee raised $181 million in september, the most for any month this year. but money aside, it appears romney's performance in last week's highly watched debate has improved his standing in the race. a new gallupck traing poll found the candidates in ae t dad heat, each receiving 4 d7% among registered voters. the president had held a five-point advantage before the debate. and the pew research center showed romney coming from eight points down to four points ahead among likely voters. there were also signs that he's regained ground in several battle ground states. all of which raises the stakes for this thursday'sen counter between vice president joe biden and vice president shall candidate paul ryan. a debate that will cover both domestic and foreign policy. for more on all this for more on all of this and the differences between the presidential candidates when it comes to foreign policy, we get two views. michele flournoy is the co-chair of the obama campaign's national securit
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